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JG26 - Squadron Profile.

JG26

Founded :
Country : Germany
Fate :

Jagdgeschwader 26 Schlageter was a Luftwaffe fighter-wing of World War II. It operated mainly in Western Europe against Great Britain, France and the United States but also saw service against Russia. It was named after Albert Leo Schlageter, a World War I veteran and Freikorps member arrested and executed by the French for sabotage in 1923.

Commanders of II. Gruppe JG 26

Hptm. Werner Palm, 1 May 1939 – 27 June 1939
Hptm Herwig Knüppel, 28 June 1939 – 19 May 1940
Hptm Karl Ebbighausen, 20 May 1940 – 31 May 1940
Hptm. Erich Noack, 1 June 1940 – 24 July 1940
Hptm Karl Ebbighausen, 25 July 1940 – 16 August 1940
Hptm Erich Bode, 17 August 1940 – 3.10.40
Hptm Walter Adolph, 4 October 1940 – 18 September 1941
Hptm Joachim Müncheberg, 19 September 1941 – 21 July 1942
Hptm Conny Meyer, 22 July 1942 – 2 January 1943
Maj Wilhelm-Ferdinand Galland, 3 January 43 – 17 August 1943
Hptm Hans Naumann, 18 August 1943 – 8 September 1943
ObLt Johannes Seifert, 9 September 1943 – 25 November 1943
Maj Wilhelm Gäth, 26 November 1943 – 1 March 1944
Hptm Hans Naumann, 2 March 1944 – 28 June 1944
Hptm Emil Lang, 29 June 1944 – 3 September 1944
Hptm Georg-Peter Eder, 4 September 1944 – 8 October 1944
Maj Anton Hackl, 9 October 1944 – 29 January 45
ObLt Waldemar Radener, 30 January 1945 – 22 February 1945
Hptm Paul Schauder, 23 February 1945 – 1 May 1945

JG26


Latest JG26 Artwork Releases !
 It was known as the Jagdverbande, the fighter arm of the Luftwaffe, and by June 1940 it boasted some of the world's greatest fighter pilots.  With tactics honed to perfection, these battle-seasoned veterans dominated the skies of Europe.  But as the war progressed, the Luftwaffe fighter pilots faced another battle, the increasingly desperate war of attrition as the Allied air forces slowly, but inevitably, ground the German war machine into defeat.  By early 1945 Allied air supremacy was overwhelming.  And yet despite overwhelming odds, from within their ranks came the most successful air Aces ever to fly in combat - names such as Hans-Joachim Marseille, the top-scoring fighter pilot in the West, the legendary Erich Rudorffer who scored more multiple victories than any other pilot and of course the Fighter General, Adolf Galland, who achieved all of his 104 victories in the West.  In total more than 100 Luftwaffe fighter pilots are known to have scored 100 or more victories, and 568 Jagdverbande flyers were holders of the Knight's Cross, Germany's highest awarded military honor.  Robert Taylor's stunning painting, beautifully captures a group of Bf109Gs from III./JG26, as they return to their forward base after a long fighter sweep along the Channel coast in early 1944.  In his unmistakable style, and with inordinate skill, Robert deftly evokes a moment of rare tranquility amidst the carnage of war as the lengthening sun glints across the frozen landscape during the short days of winter.
The Long Short Days by Robert Taylor.
 An Me109 makes a low flight over the English countryside during the Battle of Britain.  This painting was a preliminary painting by Graeme in preparation for the larger painting entitled <i>Fighter General</i>.  When Graeme traveled to Germany to have prints of <i>Fighter General</i> signed by some of the top German Aces, he took this painting with him, and they have signed it on the back of the canvas.

Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P)
 Heligoland, German coast, 18th December 1939.  Johannes <i>Macky</i> Steinhoff attacking Vickers Wellington bombers of No.37 Sqn.  A raiding force of 22 RAF Wellington Ia bombers from 9, 37 and 149 squadrons was intercepted by some 60 Me109 and Me110s.  First to engage were 6 Me109Ds from Oberleutnant Johannes <i>Macki</i> Steinhoff 's NG26's experimental night fighter staffel. In the running battle that followed Steinhoff and Feldwebel Szuggar claimed 1 bomber each.  It was a disasterous day for the RAF with a total of 12 aircraft being shot down and another 6 crash landing on their return to England.

Battle of the Bight by David Pentland. (P)
 From June 1940 on, Adolf Galland flew as a of III./JG 26, fighting in the Battle of britain with 109-Emils from bases in the Pas de Calais.  During the Battle of Britain, in a legendary front line General Officer briefing on Luftwaffe tactics, Hermann Goring asked what his pilots needed to win the battle.  Galland replied: <i>I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my squadron.</i>  Göring was speechless with rage.  It is important that this remark is not taken out of context, because Galland also stated (in his autobiography) that <i>of course fundamentally I preferred our Me109 to the Spitfire</i>.  This apparent contradiction was due to his view that because the Spitfire was more manoeuvreable he considered it more suitable to the role of defensive fighter than the Bf 109, though he actually thought that fighters should not be used in a defensive role anyway.  When Galland made the much quoted comment about the Spitfires to Göring he was <i>unbelievably vexed at the lack of understanding and stubbornness with which the command gave us orders we could not execute</i> and so made the comment as a retort to Göring.

Me109 - Adolf Galland by Jason Askew. (P)

JG26 Artwork Collection
Click the images below to view the fantastic artwork we have available to purchase!



Me109 - Adolf Galland by Jason Askew. (P)


Winter Wolves by Nicolas Trudgian.


Homeward Bound by Anthony Saunders.


Adversaries by Ivan Berryman.


Victory Above Dover by Ivan Berryman.


Knights Realm by Brian Bateman.


A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.


Tigers in Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.


Most Memorable Day by Robert Taylor.


Me109 of JG26 by Graeme Lothian. (P)

The Long Short Days by Robert Taylor.


Battle of the Bight by David Pentland. (P)


Hande Hoch! by Michael Turner.


Abbeville Boys by Robert Taylor.


Eagles on the Channel Front by Robert Taylor.


Defiant but Doomed by Stan Stokes.

Aces for : JG26
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Walter Krupinski197.00The signature of Walter Krupinski features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Anton Hackl192.00
Johannes Macky Steinhoff176.00The signature of Johannes Macky Steinhoff features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Emil Lang173.00
Joachim Muncheberg135.00The signature of Joachim Muncheberg features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Adolf Galland104.00The signature of Adolf Galland features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Josef Priller101.00
Heinrich Bartels99.00
Heinz Kemethmuller89.00
Wilhelm Philipp81.00
Georg-Peter Eder78.00
Josef Haibock77.00
Adolf Glunz72.00The signature of Adolf Glunz features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Klaus Mietusch72.00
Alfred Heckmann71.00
Heinz Lange70.00The signature of Heinz Lange features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Walter Hoeckner68.00
Fritz Losigkeit68.00The signature of Fritz Losigkeit features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Karl-Heinz Kempf65.00
Rolf Hermichen64.00
Hermann Staiger63.00
Wilhelm Freuworth58.00
Hugo Dahmer57.00The signature of Hugo Dahmer features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Johannes Seifert57.00
Wilhelm-Ferdinand Galland55.00
Karl Willius50.00
Gerhard Vogt48.00
Gerhard Schopfel45.00The signature of Gerhard Schopfel features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Johannes Schmid45.00
Wilhelm Hofmann44.00
Walter Matoni44.00
Karl Borris43.00
Rudolf Klemm42.00
Hans Dortenmann38.00
Fulbert Zink36.00
Johannes Naumann34.00The signature of Johannes Naumann features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Waldemar Soffing33.00
Gerd Wiegand32.00
Peter Crump31.00
Hermann Segatz31.00
Gustav Sprick31.00
Rolf Pingel30.00
Walter Adolph29.00
Kurt Ebersberger27.00
Wilhelm Mayer27.00
Emil Babenz24.00
Helmut Hoppe24.00
Horst Sternberg23.00
Artur Beese22.00
Otto Meyer22.00
Robert Menge22.00
Gunther Scholz22.00
Hans-Jurgen Westphal22.00
Hans Kiel20.00
Willi Roth20.00
Paul Schauder20.00
Erich Scheyda20.00
Walter Schneider20.00
Hans-Georg Dippel19.00
Peter Reischer19.00
Heinz Ebeling18.00
Walter Meyer18.00
Paul Galland17.00
Horst Ulenberg17.00
Karl Wunschelmeyer16.00
Hermann Guhl15.00
Walter Blume14.00
Wilhelm Gath14.00
Werner Gerhard13.00
Gunther Kelch13.00
Harry Koch13.00
Eduard Neumann13.00The signature of Eduard Neumann features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Johann Aistleitner12.00
Xaver Ellenrieder12.00
Heinz Gomann12.00
Franz Kunz12.00
Wolfgang Neu12.00
Peter Ahrens11.00
Joachim Gunther11.00
Georg Kiefner11.00
Erwin Leibold11.00
Erich Schwarz11.00
Herwig Knuppel11.00
Josef Burschgens10.00
Gunther Bloemertz10.00
Gerhard Guttmann10.00
Wilhelm Muller10.00
Robert Unzeitig10.00
Hans Krug10.00
Edgar Dorre9.00
Rudolf Leuschel9.00
Gerhard Schulwitz9.00
Willy Szuggar9.00
Josef Zirngibl9.00
Georg Beyer8.00
Heinrich Bierwirth8.00
Erwin Busch8.00
Kurt Hein8.00
Hermann Hoffmann8.00
Hans Johannsen8.00
Friedrich Lange8.00
Martin Rysavy8.00
Gottfried Schmidt8.00
Otto Stammberger8.00The signature of Otto Stammberger features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Heinz-Gunther Adam7.00
Karl Ebbinghausen7.00
Karl-Heinz Ehlen7.00
Walter Grunlinger7.00
Gerhard Grzymalla7.00
Eberhard Henrici7.00
Walter Holl7.00
Walter Horten7.00
Karl Laub7.00
Theo Lindemann7.00
Joachim Zeller7.00
Walter März7.00
Peter Andel6.00
Siegfried Benz6.00
Josef Gartner6.00
Heinrich Gottlob6.00
Hans Hartigs6.00
Otto-Heinrich Hilleke6.00
Heinrich Jessen6.00
Dieter Kehl6.00
Heinrich Vandeveerd6.00
Kurt Bohn5.00
Hans-Joachim Borreck5.00
Gottfried Dietze5.00
Hans Dirksen5.00
Johann Edman5.00
Hans-Joachim Fast5.00
Hans-Jurgen Frolich5.00
Erich Klein5.00
Friedrich Lindelaub5.00
Franz Luders5.00
Gerhard Muller-Duhe5.00
Wolfgang Polster5.00
Eckardt Roch5.00
Adolf Tabbat5.00
Aircraft for : JG26
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by JG26. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Fw190




Click the name above to see prints featuring Fw190 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Fokke-Wulf
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1945

Fw190

The Focke-Wulf 190 development project began in 1937. Conceived as a hedge against total dependence on the Messerchmitt 109, the 190 was designed by Kurt Tank utilizing a radial engine. This was against generally accepted design criteria in Germany, and many historians believe that the decision to produce a radial engine fighter was largely due to the limited manufacturing capacity for in-line, water-cooled engines which were widely used on all other Luftwaffe aircraft. Despite these concerns, Tanks design was brilliant, and the 190 would become one of the top fighter aircraft of WWII. The first prototype flew in mid-1939. The aircraft had excellent flying characteristics, a wonderful rate of acceleration, and was heavily armed. By late 1940 the new fighter was ordered into production. Nicknamed the butcher bird, by Luftwaffe pilots, early 190s were quite successful in the bomber interceptor role, but at this stage of the war many Allied bombing raids lacked fighter escort. As the war dragged on, Allied bombers were increasingly accompanied by fighters, including the very effective P-51 Mustang. The Allies learned from experience that the 190s performance fell off sharply at altitudes above 20,000 feet. As a result, most Allied bombing missions were shifted to higher altitudes when fighter opposition was likely. Kurt Tank had recognized this shortcoming and began working on a high-altitude version of the 190 utilizing an in-line, water-cooled engine. Utilizing a Jumo 12-cylinder engine rated at 1770-HP, and capable of 2,240-HP for short bursts with its methanol injection system, the 190D, or Long Nose or Dora as it was called, had a top speed of 426-MPH at 22,000 feet. Armament was improved with two fuselage and two wing mounted 20mm cannon. To accommodate the changes in power plants the Dora had a longer, more streamlined fuselage, with 24 inches added to the nose, and an additional 19 inches added aft of the cockpit to compensate for the altered center of gravity. By mid 1944 the Dora began to reach fighter squadrons in quantity. Although the aircraft had all the right attributes to serve admirably in the high altitude interceptor role, it was not generally focused on such missions. Instead many 190Ds were assigned to protect airfields where Me-262 jet fighters were based. This was due to the latter aircrafts extreme vulnerability to Allied attack during takeoff and landing. The 190Ds also played a major role in Operation Bodenplatte, the New Years Day raid in 1945 which destroyed approximately 500 Allied aircraft on the ground. The High Command was impressed with the 190Ds record on this raid, and ordered most future production of the Doras to be equipped as fighter-bombers. In retrospect this was a strategic error, and this capable aircraft was not fully utilized in the role for which it was intended.

Me109




Click the name above to see prints featuring Me109 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Production Began : 1937
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 33984

Me109

Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.
Signatures for : JG26
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Hauptmann Hugo Dahmer
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Hauptmann Hugo Dahmer

1 / 8 / 2008Died : 1 / 8 / 2008
1 / 8 / 2008Ace : 57.00 Victories
Hauptmann Hugo Dahmer

Hugo Dahmer . Flying with Adolf Galland's 6./JG26, Hugo Dahmer was one of II Gruppe's most successful pilots. By Feb 1941 Hugo Dahmer had in total 12 victories, built up during the Battles in France and Britain. He then served in Norway with 1./JG77 Dahmer was awarded the Knight's Cross during the invasion of Russia. For a short while back with JG26, then III./JG2. He scored 57 victories, flying a total of 309 missions. Hugo Dahmer passed away on 1st August 2008.




General Adolf Galland
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of General Adolf Galland

9 / 2 / 1996Died : 9 / 2 / 1996
9 / 2 / 1996Ace : 104.00 Victories
General Adolf Galland

Adolf Galland fought in the great Battles of Poland, France and Britain, leading the famous JG26 Abbeville Boys. He flew in combat against the RAFs best including Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. In 1941, at the age of 29, he was promoted to Inspector of the Fighter Arm. In 1942 Hitler personally selected Galland to organise the fighter escort for the Channel Dash. He became the youngest General in the German High Command but open disagreements with Goering led to his dismissal at the end of 1944. He reverted to combat flying, forming the famous JV44 wing flying the Me262 jet fighter, and was the only General in history to lead a squadron into battle. With 104 victories, all in the West, Adolf Galland received the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Born 19th March 1912, died 9th February 1996. Born in 1911, Adolf Galland learned to fly at a state-sponsored flying club in the early 1930s. In 1933 he was selected to go to Italy for secret pilot training. Galland flew for a brief time as a commercial airline pilot prior to joining the clandestine Luftwaffe as a Second Lieutenant. In April of 1935 he was assigned to JG-2, the Richtofen Fighter Wing, and in 1937 he joined the ranks of the Condor Legion flying the He-51 biplane fighter in support of General Franco during the Spanish Civil War. Despite flying 280 missions, Galland attained no aerial victories, a rather inauspicious start for a pilot would go on to attain more than 100 aerial victories - the highest for any pilot who flew on the Western Front. During Germanys invasion of Poland, Galland was assigned to an attack squadron and he flew over fifty ground sorties. He was promoted to Captain for his efforts, but Galland was anxious to return to a fighter squadron, and he got his wish in October of 1939 when he was transferred to JG-27. It was with JG-27 that Galland first learned to fly the Bf-109. In May of 1940 JG-27 flew in support of the invasion of Belgium, and Galland achieved his first combat victory on May 12. Two months later his score had risen to more than a dozen, and at this time he was once again transferred to JG-26 situated on the Channel Coast. Engaging the RAF on a daily basis during the Battle of Britain, Gallands score rose steadily until it exceeded 40 victories by September. After a short leave Galland rejoined JG-26 in Brittany, where the squadron played a defensive role. Following Germanys invasion of Russia in June of 1941, JG-26 became one of only two German fighter squadrons left on the Channel Coast. This resulted in plenty of flying, and by late in 1941 Gallands victory totals had reached 70. Following a near brush with death when the fuel tank of his 109 exploded, Galland was grounded for a time, and sent to Berlin where he was made the General of the Fighter Arm, reporting directly to Goring and Hitler. Galland spent most of the next few years carrying out inspection tours, and was at odds with his superiors about the need for an adequate fighter defense to negate ever-increasing Allied bombing of Germanys cities. He continued to fly combat missions when the opportunity presented itself, despite Gorings orders to the contrary. In January of 1945 almost 300 fighters were lost in an all-out attack on Allied airfields in France, a mission Galland did not support. He was dismissed as General of the Fighter Arm for his insubordination, but reflecting his flying abilities Hitler ordered Galland to organize JV-44, Germanys first jet-equipped fighter squadron. By March of 1945 Galland had recruited 45 of Germanys best surviving fighter pilots, and this new squadron was given the difficult task of trying to counter the daily onslaught of 15th Air Force bombers coming at Germany from the South. Gallands final mission of the War occurred on April 26 when he attained his 102nd and 103rd confirmed aerial victories prior to crash landing his damaged Me262. Several days later the War was over for both Galland and Germany. General Galland died in 1996.

Adolf Galland signing the print - Eagles Over the Steppes - by Graeme Lothian.



Karl-Georg Genth
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Karl-Georg Genth
Karl-Georg Genth

12th Staffel D-9 pilot Uffz Karl-Georg Genth, who flew with III./JG26. Genth was shot down in Yellow 15 near Enschede on 7th March 1945 by Tempests of No.3 Squadron, bailing out and hitting the tailplane of his D-9, and breakinghis left arm in the fall. Genth also flew the 109G-6, G-10 and K-4 variants, and flew with the extremely popular Hptm Walter Krupinski on several missions in which Krupinski was Gruppenkommandeur. Genth also took part in the air battle which brought down the famed Tempest ace Foob Fairbanks on 28th February 1945. Genth tallied a final total of 2 victories.



Oberleutnant Adolf Glunz
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberleutnant Adolf Glunz

1 / 8 / 2002Died : 1 / 8 / 2002
1 / 8 / 2002Ace : 72.00 Victories
Oberleutnant Adolf Glunz

Adolf Glunz served with 4/JG-52 on both the Channel Coast and then in Russia. Returning to the English Channel with II./JG-25 he became one of the most successful fighter pilots on the Western Front. Adolf Glunz saw combat continuously right up to the war end and, remarkably, was never shot down or wounded in over 574 missions, many whilst flying the Fw190. Awarded the Knight's Cross in 1943, he acheived a personal score of 71 victories. He died 1st August 2002.




General Walter Krupinski
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of General Walter Krupinski

7 / 10 / 2000Died : 7 / 10 / 2000
7 / 10 / 2000Ace : 197.00 Victories
General Walter Krupinski

Walter Krupinski first saw combat against the RAF on the Western Front. Transferring to the east, he became a Squadron Commander in the legendary JG52. In 1943 his victories reached 150 but, in March 1944 with 177 victories to his name, he was transferred to Germany to command JG11. Flying high altitude Me109s, he chalked up another 12 victories before being wounded. In September 1944 he was promoted Kommandeur of III./JG26 and led them on Operation Bodenplatte before joining Galland's famous JV44. He completed the war with 197 victories in over 1100 missions.

Walter Krupinski, known as Graf Punski or Count Punski in the Jagdwaffe, was a swashbuckling fly-boy with a phenomenal record of 197 aerial victories. Krupinski not only never lost a wingman, but also had the ability to help beginners develop to their full potential. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1939 as a student in the 11th Flying Training Regiment. He first served with the Jagderganzungsgruppe JG52, a combat replacement unit, flying the Me109, in October 1940. By the end of 191, he had earned the Iron Cross 1st class after his seventh victory and was awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knights Cross one year later after scoring over 52 aerial victories. Krupinski taught the aerial art of closing with the enemy aircraft until it filled the windscreen before firing. It was during this time that the young Erich Hartmann was assigned as Krupinskis wingman. The young and overly enthusiastic Hartmann was seriously struggling in his first attempts at aerial combat, resulting in severe reprimands by the group commander. However, under Krupinskis expert tutelage, Hartmann mastered the art of aerial combat and went on to become the top scoring fighter ace in the world with 352 victories. While still a first lieutenant, Krupinski was selected as Dquadron Commander of 7.JG52 in the spring of 1943. On 5th of July of the same year, he scored victories 80 to 90 - 11 in one day! He later transferred to the Reich Defence in the west with 1./JG5 in the spring of 1944. His units mission was to help halt the Allied strategic bombardment campaign against Germany. Krupinski continued to rack up aerial victories and was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross after his 177th victory. He was promoted to Captain and became Group Commander of II./JG 11. Later, Krupinski became Group Commander of II./JG 26 Schlageter Group. In March 1945 he joined General Adolf Gallands famed Jagdverband 44 and flew Messerschmitt Me262 jet fighters until the end of the war. After logging a total of 1,100 combat missions, Krupinski was officialy credited with 197 aerial victories. Krupinski was also wounded seven times in aerial combat and received the Verwundetenabzeichen in Gold - the German equivalent of the American Purple Heart. A civilian after the war, Krupinski later joined the new Luftwaffe in 1952 and was promoted to major in 1955. He received jet fighting training from the Royal Air Force and became the first commander of the Jagdbomber Geschwader, Fighter-Bomber Wing - 33. Krupinski flew various jet fighters in the German Air Force, but held dear the last aircraft he flew until his retirement, his beloved F-104G Starfighter. General Krupinski retired as Commander of the German Air Force Tactical Air Command in 1976.

He received the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves. He died 7th October 2000.

Walter Krupinski signing the print - Eagles Over the Steppes - by Graeme Lothian

Walter Krupinski signing the print - JV44 Kette of Swallows - by Graeme Lothian

Walter Krupinski - Knight's Cross.



Unteroffizier Ottomar Kruse
Click the name above to see prints signed by Unteroffizier Ottomar Kruse

9 / 10 / 2009Died : 9 / 10 / 2009
Unteroffizier Ottomar Kruse

Pilot, 8./JG26. Having started flying prior to the war, he was appointed as an flight instructor, but risked a court martial in turning down this appointment, in favour of becoming a fighter pilot. During one mission, he scored two confirmed victories, earning him the Iron Cross. Sadly, Ottomar Kruse passed away on 9th October 2009.




Major Heinz Lange
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Major Heinz Lange

26 / 2 / 2006Died : 26 / 2 / 2006
26 / 2 / 2006Ace : 70.00 Victories
Major Heinz Lange

At the outbreak of war Heinz Lange was with I./JG21 scoring his first victory in October 1939. He flew 76 missions in the Battle of Britain with 8./JG54, and never lost a wingman. After flying in the Balkan campaign he took part in the invasion of Russia, scoring 7 victories during the first week. In October 1941 he was given command of 1./JG54 and in 1942 command of 3./JG51. In January 1944 Heinz Lange returned to JG54 to command 1.Gruppe and then back to JG51 where he was appointed Kommodore of JG51 Molders, leading IV./JG51 at the same time. Heinz Lange flew over 628 missions and achieved 70 victories. He was awarded the Knight's Cross. Born 2nd October 1917, died 26th February 2006.

Heinz Lange signing the print - Fighter General - by Graeme Lothian

Heinz Lange with a model of his favourite aircraft.



Oberst Johannes Naumann
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberst Johannes Naumann
26 / 2 / 2006Ace : 34.00 Victories
Oberst Johannes Naumann

With III./JG26 at the outbreak of war, Johannes flew in all the campaigns of 1939 - 40, including the Battle of Britain. He led 6./JG26 on the Channel Front, and later 7./JG26. In March 1944 he became Kommandeur of II./JG26, and in August Kommandeur II./JG6. He flew 450 missions, scored 45 victories, all in the West, and was awarded the Knight's Cross in 1944.




Oberst Eduard Neumann
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Oberst Eduard Neumann

9 / 8 / 2004Died : 9 / 8 / 2004
9 / 8 / 2004Ace : 13.00 Victories
Oberst Eduard Neumann

A veteran of the Spanish Campaign, Edward Neumann, at the start of the war, was leading 4./JG26 in France, later promoted Adjutant of I./JG27. He took part in the Balkan Campaign before moving in 1941 to North Africa, where I./JG27 was the only German fighter unit for the first nine months. In 1942 he became Kommodore of JG27, a position which he held throughout the remainder of the Desert Campaign. He was credited with moulding the careers of many outstanding pilots, the best known being the young Hauptmann Marseille. Following the defeat of Rommel's Afrika Korps at El Alamein JG27 covered their retreat back to Tunisia. When his wing left the desert, 'Edu' Neumann was transferred to the Staff of General of the Fighter Arm, where he remained until 1944. Promoted to Oberst in the autumn of that year, he took over as Fighter Commander of Northern Italy. Edu Neumann ended the war as one of the Luftwaffe's most highly respected Commanders. Died 9th August 2004.

Eduard Neumann - photo taken during the war.

Eduard Neumann - photo taken c.2001 at a print signing event.




Major Gerhard Schopfel
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Major Gerhard Schopfel

17 / 5 / 2003Died : 17 / 5 / 2003
17 / 5 / 2003Ace : 45.00 Victories
Major Gerhard Schopfel

Gerhard Schopfel was Staffelkapitan of 9./JG26 at the outbreak of war, and became Kommandeur of III./JG26 in August 1940. In December 1941 he succeeded Adolf Galland as Kommodore of JG26 until Januray 1943. Later, Kommodore of JG4 and JG6. He flew over 700 combat missions, achieving 40 victories, all in the West. He was awarded the Knight's Cross in 1940. Died 17th May 2003.

Gerhard Schopfel and artist Graeme Lothian with the original painting - Fighter General.



Hauptmann Otto Stamberger
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Hauptmann Otto Stamberger

11 / 7 / 2001Died : 11 / 7 / 2001
11 / 7 / 2001Ace : 8.00 Victories
Hauptmann Otto Stamberger

'Stotto' Stammberger joined the Luftwaffe at the outbreak of war, joining 9./JG26. In February 1942 he took part in the air cover for the Channel Dash, and later in the battles over the Dieppe landings. In February 1943 he was promoted Staffelkapitän of 4./JG26, before being shot down twice, and seriously injured. Returning to flying months later he became Adjutant of I./JG26. 'Stotto' flew 112 combat operations and was awarded the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd Class. He passed away on 11th July 2001.



General Johannes Steinhoff
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of General Johannes Steinhoff

21 / 2 / 1994Died : 21 / 2 / 1994
21 / 2 / 1994Ace : 176.00 Victories
General Johannes Steinhoff

By early 1940 Macky Steinhoff was leading 4 / JG-52 during the Battle of Britain. He was then transferred to the eastern front where his success continued. In the final stages of the defence of the Reich he joined JV-44 flying the ME 262 in which he scored 6 victories before being seriously burned in a crash. He flew 939 missions scored 178 victories and was awarded the Knights Cross with Oak leaves and swords.


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