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Flt. Lt. Peter May - Art prints and originals signed by Flt. Lt. Peter May

Peter May

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The signature of Flt. Lt. Peter May

Flt. Lt. Peter May

Peter May was under training as a pilot in the Civil Air Guard at Weston Super Mare on the 3d September 1939 and was immediately accepted for further training with the RAF at Downing College, Cambridge. In June 1940 he was posted to a holding unit at Hernswell, near Lincoln, from which Hampden aircraft were employed in dropping leaflets over Germany. This aerodrome was subjected to one of the first, possibly the first, bombing raid on England by the Germans. Peter went solo on a Magister monoplane at Kingsdown Aerodrome, Chester on the 26 th June 1940. On the 1st July he suffered an engine failure over the Solway Firth, but managed to force land safely. As a reward for this safe landing he was one of six fortunate pupils on the Course of 52 to be selected for training as fighter pilots. His first solo flight in a Spitfire 1 at Hawardene Operational Unit, was on the 10th December 1940. A few days later flying over Liverpool in poor visibility, the engine failed. He decided to pancake in the Mersey but fortunately at the last minute he saw a field alongside. By using his emergency pressure bottle to lower the undercarriage quickly he managed to force land safely. Spitfire 1 aircraft undercarriage had to be raised and lowered manually. In January 1941 with only 20 hours experience on Spitfires he was posted to Sailor Malan's 74 Squadron based at Biggin Hill and later at Manston. This squadron was engaged in protecting the Channel convoys, the south-coast radar stations and the Lysanders on rescue missions over the North Sea. Returning from operational patrol over the Channel on the 21st April 1941, Peter crash-landed at Manston Aerodrome. he was taken to Margate General Hospital suffering from concussion and a broken leg. During the latter part of 1941 Peter was appointed Aerodrome Control Pilot at Manston and recommenced flying non-operationaily in December 1941. In June 1942 he moved to No. 1 Squadron at Tangmere, flying Hurricanes and mainly engaged in sweeps over France. In July it was decided to convert No. 1 squadron into a Night Fighter Squadron. As Peter's nightflying experience was limited he was sent on a Beam Approach Course at Watchfield. Peter was commissioned in 1943 and in 1944 was appointed C.O. of a Communications Flight on the island of Orkney. In July 1945 he joined 286 Hurricane Squadron at Weston Zoyland, Somerset, flying mostly at night. His completed his flying career as Naval Liaison Officer with 667 Squadron at Gosport, flying Spitfire XV1 s. Peter amassed 1687 flying hours, including 110 in Spitfires and 55 in Hurricanes.

Items Signed by Flt. Lt. Peter May

One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......
Spitfire Patrol by Philip West.
Price : £195.00
One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......

Quantity:
 One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......
Spitfire Patrol by Philip West (AP)
Price : £250.00
One summers evening, Douglas Bader (flying Mk V Spitfire without cannons) and Johnnie Johnson (flying the Mk VB Spitfire with cannons) of the Tangmere Wing, share a few moments of peaceful flying whilst on patrol over the English Channel. ......

Quantity:
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......Supermarine Spitfire MkI by Philip West.
Price : £60.00
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......

Quantity:
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......Supermarine Spitfire MkI by Philip West. (AP)
SOLD OUT
High over the southern coast of England in 1940 a Spitfire (Mk 1) of 609 Squadron from Middle Wallop, flown by Flying Officer John Dundas, lies in wait for enemy aircraft (Junkers 87 divebombers) on their way to attack British naval installations at ......NOT
AVAILABLE
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill ma......Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West.
Price : £60.00
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill ma......

Quantity:
 The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill m......Hawker Hurricane Mk I by Philip West. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Hawker Hurricane was Britains most important aircraft in the Battle of Britain, credited with destroying more enemy aircraft than all other forms of defence combined. Flown by Flying Officer Arthur Cowes, the aircraft depicted shows seven kill m......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flt. Lt. Peter May

Flt. Lt. Peter May

Squadrons for : Flt. Lt. Peter May
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flt. Lt. Peter May. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.1 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

In Omnibus Princeps - First in all things

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No.1 Sqn RAF

On 13 May 1912, with the establishment of the Royal Flying Corps, No. 1 Company of the Air Battalion was redesignated No. 1 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. No. 1 Squadron was one of the original three Royal Flying Corps squadrons. Maitland continued as the new squadron's Officer Commanding and he was promoted to major several days after the establishment of the squadron. It retained the airships Beta and Gamma, adding Delta and Eta, as well as kites and a few spherical balloons. However, in October 1913 a sudden decision was made to transfer all the airships to the Naval Wing of the RFC (which became the Royal Naval Air Service by Admiralty dictat, not Cabinet decision, on 1 July 1914). While retaining kites 1 Squadron was reorganised as an 'aircraft park' for the British Expeditionary Force. On 1 May 1914, Major Charles Longcroft was appointed as the new squadron commander. Apart from a few weeks as a supernumerary in August and September 1914, Longcroft continued as the squadron commander until January 1915. The squadron returned to the UK from France in March 1919, being formally disbanded on 20 January 1920. On the next day it reformed at Risalpur in the North West Frontier of India (now part of Pakistan), flying the Sopwith Snipe. and from January 1920. It moved to Hinaidi near Baghdad in Iraq in May 1921, to carry out policing duties, retaining its Snipes, although it also received one Bristol Jupiter engined Nieuport Nighthawk for evaluation. It remained in Iraq, carrying out strafing and bombing against hostile tribal forces until November 1926 when it was disbanded. In early 1927 it was reformed at Tangmere, Sussex as a Home Defence Fighter Squadron, equipped with the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin. After receiving the Hawker Fury Mk.1 in February 1932, the squadron gained a reputation for aerobatics, giving displays throughout the United Kingdom and at the Zurich International Air Meeting in July 1937, where its display impressed but it was clear that it was outclassed by the German Messerschmitt Bf 109 and Dornier Do 17 also displayed at Zurich. The squadron re-equipped with the Hurricane Mk.I in October 1938 By the outbreak of the Second World War the Squadron had worked up sufficiently to deploy to France as part of 67 Wing of the Advanced Air Striking Force. In October it flew over enemy territory for the first time and on the 30th of that month claimed its first victory, a Dornier DO17. Further occasional combat took place and the successes mounted. However, the situation developed significantly in April 1940, and 10th May was the date on which No 1(Fighter) Squadron became fully operation in every sense of the word. Fighting was intense and a week later the Squadron was bombed out of its base at Berry-au-Bac; then began a series of retreats ending finally in a return to the UK. The Squadron was back at Tangmere by 23rd June and operational the following month. In August it marked its entry into the Battle of Britain by destroying 2 Messerschmitt BF110s; there was no let up in the fighting until 9th September when the Squadron moved North to Wittering for a rest. It returned South for the New Year when it engaged in fighter sweeps and carried out bomber escort duties. In February, it started Rhubarb and night flying; during the month the first of its Hurricane 11As arrived. This heralded a period of change for the Squadron whose strength now included both Czechs and Poles; the emphasis increasingly focused on night flying. In July the Squadron returned to Tangmere and, having achieved night operational status, this became its main task. The Squadron continued to conduct night intruder patrol until re-equipping with Hawker Typhoons in July 1942;it then moved North to Acklington where it reverted to daytime operations. The Unit exchanged its Typhoons for Spitfire X1s in April 1944 and with these continued its bombing raids. In June the Squadron began anti-V patrols (Divers) and this became its exclusive occupation, eventually tallying 39 hits. In the autumn it reverted to carrying out bomber escorts; to extend its range it sued the airfield at Haldegham on the Continent as an advanced landing ground. In May 1945 it converted to Spitfire F21s but these were only used operationally to cover the Channel Island landings. In 1946 the Squadron returned to Tangmere and took delivery of its first jet aircraft, Gloster Meteors. These aircraft were followed by Hawker Hunter F5s, which were flown from Cyprus during 1956 Suez crisis. In June 1958 No 1(Fighter) Squadron was disbanded but was reformed almost immediately on 1st July, to fly Hunter F6s from Stradishall, by renumbering No 2683 Squadron. It then moved to Waterbeach from where, flying Hunter FGA9s, it operated in the ground attack role as part of 38 Group. The Squadron continued in this role for the next 8 years, operating out of Waterbeach and then West Raynham. July 1969 heralded a move to Wittering to commence conversion to the Harrier and become the first operational squadron in the world to fly this unique vertical/short take off and landing aircraft. Since this time No 1(Fighter) Squadron has served in many parts of the globe, including Belize and most notably, the South Atlantic during the Falklands War in 1982, where it undertook the air defence role in Ascension Island before deploying for aircraft carrier based operations over the Falkland Islands equipped with Sidewinder air to air missile. Aircraft flew for 9 hours, direct to Ascension Island which set a new distance/duration record for the Harrier. Some aircraft then flew direct to the South Atlantic, where they operated from HMS HERMES. During this conflict, over 130 sorties were flown against heavily defended targets on the Islands; 3 aircraft were shot down by enemy fire. All 3 pilots ejected successfully, although one, who sustained shoulder injuries, was captured and became the only prisoner of war; he was later repatriated to the UK. The Squadron moved to RAF Stanley in the Falkland Islands at the end of hostilities and took on air defence duties until the latter part of the year when it returned to Wittering.

No.286 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 17th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 16th May 1945

Praesidia nostra exercemus - We exercise our defences

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No.286 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.667 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 20th December 1945

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.667 Sqn RAF
No.667 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.74 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st July 1917
Trinidad

I fear no man

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No.74 Sqn RAF

Hurricane of 56 Squadron was shot down by mistake by No. 74 Squadron and Pilot Officer M L Halton-Harrop of 56 sqd was killed on the 6th September 1939
Aircraft for : Flt. Lt. Peter May
A list of all aircraft associated with Flt. Lt. Peter May. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hurricane




Click the name above to see prints featuring Hurricane aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1936
Number Built : 14533

Hurricane

Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles. The Hurricane was armed with eight fixed wing mounted .303 browning machine guns in the Mark I and twelve .303 browning's in the MKIIB in the Hurricane MKIIC it had four 20mm cannon. All time classic fighter the Hurricane was designed in 1933-1934, the first prototype flew in June 1936 and a contract for 600 for the Royal Air Force was placed. The first production model flew ion the 12th October 1937 and 111 squadron of the Royal Air Force received the first Hurricanes in January 1938. By the outbreak of World war two the Royal Air Force had 18 operational squadrons of Hurricanes. During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots. The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles. in total 14,533 Hurricanes were built.

Magister


Click the name above to see prints featuring Magister aircraft.


Magister

Full profile not yet available.

Spitfire




Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

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