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Dakota Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Stan Stokes.- Panzer - Prints .com
DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor. <p> As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies.  With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going.  But there was a problem.  Too few trucks, and too few drivers.  The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative.  Action was needed, and quickly.  Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed.  the Allies would advance on a broad front.  But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance.  For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven.  The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem.  On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine.  On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge.  The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine.  Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived.  But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne.  Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine.  Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out.  If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944.  Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter. <b><p>Signed by : <br>Corporal Herb Jr Suerth, <br>Private 1st Class Bill Maynard<br>and<br>Sergant Ed Tipper, <br>. <p>Limited edition of 450 prints.<p> Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm)  Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)
STK0107B. D-Day Invaders by Stan Stokes. <p> You are about to embark on the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other fronts, you will bring the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world. These were the final words of Supreme Commander Eisenhower to the huge force assembled in June of 1944 on the eve of D-Day. Parachute infantry units would play an important role on D-Day. Although Billy Mitchell had contemplated forming airborne military forces during WW I, it was not until May of 1939 that the United States commenced a study regarding the feasibility of creating an air infantry. By 1940 an all-volunteer test platoon had been organized at Ft. Benning, Georgia.  As the threat of War continued, the Army began experimenting with gliders in mid-1941. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Army established Parachute Infantry Battalions, and by early 1943 an Airborne Command was organized as well as an Air Transport Command to facilitate the training of air crews necessary for the deployment of airborne forces. By mid-1942 authorization was received to form two airborne divisions the 82nd and the 101st. With a strength of about 8,000 men, these divisions were about half the normal strength of an infantry division. The first major test for Americas new airborne forces came in North Africa during operation TORCH where the 1st Battalion of the 503rd Infantry was deployed. The 82nd Airborne was later successfully deployed during the invasion of Sicily. Operation OVERLORD, the code name for the D-Day invasion, included both of Americas Airborne Divisions as well as the British 6th Airborne Division. The plan called for numerous parachute jumps and glider landings during the evening prior to the invasion. Supplemental jumps or landings would take place later during daylight hours to reinforce these troops and bring in supplies. Although eighteen aircraft were utilized as pathfinders, the evening jumps were highly scattered and off target in many cases. Despite the massive difficulty in reassembling, the troops of the 101st and 82nd performed their missions with distinction. By June 9 nearly all airborne objectives had been secured despite heavy casualties. Both the 101st and the 82nd each lost about 1,200 men killed-in-action. By occupying German forces behind the invasion front, these airborne forces saved the lives of many on the beaches at Normandy. The 101st and 82nd Divisions continued fighting until mid-July when they were pulled back to England. During these hectic weeks of fighting casualty rates were in excess of 50%. As depicted in Stan Stokes painting, which is dedicated to all those who participated in the Great Crusade, a C-47  Skytrain (bearing white and black invasion stripes) passes over the beaches of Normandy following a drop behind enemy lines on June 6, 1944. <b><p>Signed by Gen Matt Matheson (deceased). <p> 225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot, and a remarque.<p>Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)

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Dakota Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Stan Stokes.

PCK2051. Dakota Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Stan Stokes.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM1841. Road to the Rhine by Robert Taylor.

As the Allied armies dashed across France after victory in Normandy, they remained reliant on one thing - supplies. With Cherbourg the only port in use, everything depended on trucks to deliver enough fuel, food and ammunition to keep the momentum going. But there was a problem. Too few trucks, and too few drivers. The invasion was in danger of stalling, and if it did, the Germans might just regain the initiative. Action was needed, and quickly. Montgomery argued that all resources be channeled into a single, powerful thrust into Germany, but Eisenhower disagreed. the Allies would advance on a broad front. But he did give Montgomery the First Allied Airborne Army to try and capture the major bridges in Holland on the road to the Rhine, ahead of the Allies advance. For the men of the 101st Airborne, the Screaming Eagles, their task was to seize the bridges at Eindhoven. The 82nd would do the same at Nijmegan, and the British 1st Airborne would capture the farthest bridge, at Arnhem. On the ground the British 30th Corps would advance northwards and link up with them, and, if successful, turn the German flank on the Rhine. On 17th September 1944 the plan was put into action, the 101st quickly securing all of its objectives, and the 82nd capturing one bridge. The British 1st Airborne fought its way into Arnhem and seized the bridge over the Rhine. Now all they had to do was hold out until the 30th Corps arrived. But 30th Corps was making slow progress, and although the men of the 101st and the 82nd held out until relieved, in Arnhem it was too late to save the British 1st Airborne. Battle-weary, without ammunition or supplies, only a few survivors escaped back across the Rhine. Of the 10,000 men who had landed, just 2,000 made it out. If the operation had succeeded the war in Europe might have been over by Christmas 1944. Instead, hostilities would continue through the bitter winter.

Signed by :
Corporal Herb Jr Suerth,
Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
and
Sergant Ed Tipper,
.

Limited edition of 450 prints.

Paper size 33.5 inches x 25 inches (85cm x 61cm) Image size 27 inches x 17.5 inches (69cm x 44cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

STK0107B. D-Day Invaders by Stan Stokes.

You are about to embark on the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other fronts, you will bring the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world. These were the final words of Supreme Commander Eisenhower to the huge force assembled in June of 1944 on the eve of D-Day. Parachute infantry units would play an important role on D-Day. Although Billy Mitchell had contemplated forming airborne military forces during WW I, it was not until May of 1939 that the United States commenced a study regarding the feasibility of creating an air infantry. By 1940 an all-volunteer test platoon had been organized at Ft. Benning, Georgia. As the threat of War continued, the Army began experimenting with gliders in mid-1941. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Army established Parachute Infantry Battalions, and by early 1943 an Airborne Command was organized as well as an Air Transport Command to facilitate the training of air crews necessary for the deployment of airborne forces. By mid-1942 authorization was received to form two airborne divisions the 82nd and the 101st. With a strength of about 8,000 men, these divisions were about half the normal strength of an infantry division. The first major test for Americas new airborne forces came in North Africa during operation TORCH where the 1st Battalion of the 503rd Infantry was deployed. The 82nd Airborne was later successfully deployed during the invasion of Sicily. Operation OVERLORD, the code name for the D-Day invasion, included both of Americas Airborne Divisions as well as the British 6th Airborne Division. The plan called for numerous parachute jumps and glider landings during the evening prior to the invasion. Supplemental jumps or landings would take place later during daylight hours to reinforce these troops and bring in supplies. Although eighteen aircraft were utilized as pathfinders, the evening jumps were highly scattered and off target in many cases. Despite the massive difficulty in reassembling, the troops of the 101st and 82nd performed their missions with distinction. By June 9 nearly all airborne objectives had been secured despite heavy casualties. Both the 101st and the 82nd each lost about 1,200 men killed-in-action. By occupying German forces behind the invasion front, these airborne forces saved the lives of many on the beaches at Normandy. The 101st and 82nd Divisions continued fighting until mid-July when they were pulled back to England. During these hectic weeks of fighting casualty rates were in excess of 50%. As depicted in Stan Stokes painting, which is dedicated to all those who participated in the Great Crusade, a C-47 Skytrain (bearing white and black invasion stripes) passes over the beaches of Normandy following a drop behind enemy lines on June 6, 1944.

Signed by Gen Matt Matheson (deceased).

225 prints from the signed limited edition of 4750 prints, with signature of Stan Stokes and pilot, and a remarque.

Image size 16 inches x 11.5 inches (41cm x 30cm)


Website Price: £ 240.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £350.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £110




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Corporal Herb Jr Suerth
*Signature Value : £20 (matted)

18 year old Herb Suerth enlisted as a volunteer for the Reserve Engineer Corps on 11th November 1942, but after a change of heart in 1944 he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, beginning parachute school training in August that year. After final combat training in Holland, Herb was trucked into Bastogne in December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge, also fighting in Foy. On 9th January 1945 Herb was wounded by artillery fire and his legs were severely injured but ultimately saved. He was shipped out of England and back to the US on 8th April 1945.


Private 1st Class Bill Maynard
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

Born in 1923, Bill Maynard enlisted into the 101st Airborne Division in 1942, completing his training with Easy Company at camp in Toccoa, Georgia. Posted to Europe, Bill completed his combat training prior to D-Day, and jumped with the rest of Easy Company into Normandy on D-Day itself. He was wounded in heavy fighting shortly afterwards, receiving the Purple Heart, but continued to fight on. An experienced marksman with pistol, rifle and machine-gun, he fought with Easy Company throughout Normandy, into Holland, at Bastogne, and into southern Germany at the end of the war.


Sergant Ed Tipper
*Signature Value : £10 (matted)

When I came out of the Army I walked with a cane and wore an eye patch. The thing I remember most was the tremendous response of everybody I met to do everything they could do to show support for the military. Maybe the support felt exaggerated to me because I had clearly been shot up and wounded. Whenever I ate at a restaurant I went to the cashier and there was almost never a bill. Or the waitress nodded her head and said, A gentleman over at that table has paid. Of course I was home a year ahead of everybody else. But that sort of thing happened to me a lot.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Major General S H Matt Matheson (deceased)

Major General S H Matt Matheson (deceased)
*Signature Value : £30 (matted)

Born in Seattle Washington on August 11, 1920, General Matheson graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles, and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry Reserve in 1942. He joined the 506th Parachute Infantry of the 101st Airborne Division after graduation. This is the unit made famous by historian Stephen Ambrose in his 1992 novel Band of Brothers. General Matheson participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the liberation of Holland, the defense of Bastogne, and the seizure of the Berchtesgarden area. Following WW 11 he served in various command and staff positions in the 82nd Airborne Division. During the Korean War, General Matheson was the G-3 Plans Officer of the X Corps and participated in the landings at Inchon and Wonsan, as well as the amphibious withdrawal at Hungnam. Following a tour of duty with the XVIII Airborne Corps, he was assigned to the US Army Europe as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, for the 1 st Infantry Division. In 195 8 General Matheson was assigned to the 101st Airborne as Deputy Battle Group Commander, and then later as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3. General Matheson returned to Europe in 1961 as Commander of the 10th Special Forces. After being reassigned to the States, Matheson became Assistant Division Commander of the 101st Airborne Division, and then assumed command of the Ist Brigade of the 101st Airborne division in Vietnam. Following his tour of duty in Vietnam, General Matheson was put in command of Fort Campbell. Later, the General served in Korea again, as Commander of the 2nd Infantry Division. Returning to the United States in 1970, he served as Director of the International Staff, International American Defense Board. In 1971 Matheson moved to Fort M0herson and served as Chief of Staff, Third U.S. Army. Prior to his retirement in 1975 General Matheson commanded the Army Readiness Region IV. General Matheson, who was one of the first paratroopers dropped during the D-Day invasion, made more than one hundred parachute jumps during his career, and his numerous decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, four Bronze Stars, twelve Air Medals, the Army Commendation Medal, the Purple Heart, Master Parachutist Badge, and third Combat Infantry Badge. His foreign awards include the Belgian Fourragere, Bronze Lion of the Netherlands, Orange Lanyard of the Netherlands, National Order of Vietnam (5th Class), Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with two palms, Republic of Korea Order of National Security, and Vietnamese Civic Actions Honor Medal. General Matheson, who passed away on January 8, 2005, resided in Carmel, California in his later years. Like many men of his "greatest generation" General Matheson was a modest man who didn't boast of his achievements during WW 11.

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