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Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)

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The signature of Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)

John Anthony Sanderson Hall was born in Oxford on Christmas Day 1921. His father was William Glenvil Hall, MP for Colne Valley and Financial Secretary to the Treasury in Attlee's government. From his father, a life-long Quaker, John inherited a belief in practical action rather than ideology, along with a sense of decency and respect for the rights of individuals. He attended the Quaker co-educational Leighton Park School, Reading, then worked briefly as a publisher's reader and studied at the Sorbonne before returning to this country and joining the RAF at the height of the Battle of Britain. After training as a night-fighter pilot, Hall joined No 85 Squadron, At that time, 85 Squadron flew twin engine Havocs, a night fighter version of the American light bomber, the Boston, with the radar operator where the Boston's gun turret would have been and 12 machine guns in the nose, in place of the Boston's navigator. The radar then was the Mark 4, not very reliable, and with a very limited range. During 1942, the Squadron re-equipped with the much faster and more maneuverable Mosquito, with a scanner in the nose for the infinitely more effective Mark 8 radar and 4 cannon. After excelling on an air gunnery course at the Central Gunnery School, Hall became an instructor at No 51 Operational Training Unit. He became an ardent believer in the need for fighter pilots to understand fully the basics of air-to-air shooting, something that he felt most of them lacked. He likened the problem to shooting game birds when an estimate of range, line and deflection held the key to success. Hall joined the New Zealanders of No 488 in November 1943, and was crewed up with Cairns, an experienced radar operator. Two months after their initial success, Hall and Cairns were on a routine patrol over Essex when they were directed to a contact flying at 18,000ft. They identified a Junkers 88, which they shot down and saw crash with a tremendous explosion. The enemy aircraft had landed on a group of dispersed bombers on the USAAF airfield at Earls Colne, severely damaging a number of them. Hall was doubtful about claiming this as a kill. He shot down another bomber off the Essex coast on April 19 1944. As he approached to land, he was told to wait until another Mosquito had landed ahead of him. In the event, the other Mosquito turned out to be a Junkers 88; the crew claimed they thought they were landing in Holland. After shooting down their fifth German bomber, as it attacked Bristol on May 22, both Hall and Cairns were awarded the DFC. Hall's citation described him as a highly efficient and courageous fighter. On the night before D-Day, Hall flew one of the many night fighters that patrolled over the beachhead keeping German bombers away from the invasion fleet. By mid-August, the crews of No 488 had destroyed 49 enemy aircraft. The sum of 50 had been accrued at various fund-raising events, and it was agreed that this should go to the ground crew of the aircraft achieving the squadron's 50th success. During the night of August 14/15, Hall attacked a German bomber, but it escaped. Shortly afterwards a second bomber was attacked and Hall succeeded in shooting it down 20 miles south of Caen, much to the delight of his ground crew. After moving to an advanced airfield in France, further success came on the night of December 23/24. Two days later, however, Hall had a narrow escape. Flying in atrocious weather in an attempt to support Allied troops under attack during the German's lightning Ardennes offensive, he was prevented by blizzards from returning to his base at Amiens. With virtually no fuel, he saw a light and crash-landed on a US forward grass airstrip and the Mosquito was wrecked. Hall scored his last kill on March 27 1945. He pressed home his attack from such close range that his Mosquito was hit by debris from the enemy bomber. The port engine was damaged and subsequently caught fire, but Hall managed to crash land on an airfield in Holland; his aircraft was almost completely burnt out. A few days later, he and Cairns each received a Bar to their DFCs. After leaving the RAF at the end of 1946, Hall went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, to read Law. He was called to the Bar by Inner Temple in November 1948, and joined chambers at Lamb Building. He died on 24th September 2015.


Awarded the Distinguished Flying CrossAwarded a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Flying Cross
Bar to the
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)

 The ever-vigilant crew of this Mosquito night-fighter successfully intercept a Luftwaffe Bf110 as it heads towards a bomber stream over target in Germany. ......Night Hawks by Philip West.
Price : £125.00
The ever-vigilant crew of this Mosquito night-fighter successfully intercept a Luftwaffe Bf110 as it heads towards a bomber stream over target in Germany. ......

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 The ever-vigilant crew of this Mosquito night-fighter successfully intercept a Luftwaffe Bf110 as it heads towards a bomber stream over target in Germany. ......Night Hawks by Philip West (AP)
Price : £150.00
The ever-vigilant crew of this Mosquito night-fighter successfully intercept a Luftwaffe Bf110 as it heads towards a bomber stream over target in Germany. ......

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 Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircr......
Time To Go by Philip West.
Price : £150.00
Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircr......

Quantity:
 Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircr......
Time To Go by Philip West. (AP)
Price : £195.00
Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircr......

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 With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......
Day Duties for the Night Workers by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Price : £295.00
With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......

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 With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......
Day Duties for the Night Workers by Robert Taylor. (B)
Price : £250.00
With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......

Quantity:
 With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......
Day Duties for the Night Workers by Robert Taylor. (C)
SOLD OUT
With its mission completed, the mighty Lancaster slowly rolls to a halt on the lonely dispersal point, the roar of its four pulsating Merlin engines steadily slackens, replaced by an eerie silence, broken only by the snapping cracks of cooling metal......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)


Pilot Signed Mosquito Aircraft Prints.
Pack Price : £320.00
Saving : £410
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (C)
A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
Shining the Way (Mosquito) by Ivan Berryman.

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Mosquito Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £170.00
Saving : £190
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (APB)

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Pilot Signed Mosquito Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £120.00
Saving : £130
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
A Moments Peace by Ivan Berryman. (C)

Quantity:
WW2 Mosquito Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Stuart Brown.
Pack Price : £130.00
Saving : £200
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
The Berlin Express by Stuart Brown.

Quantity:
de Havilland Mosquito Aviation Prints by Philip West and Anthony Saunders.
Pack Price : £110.00
Saving : £110
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders.

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Pilot Signed Mosquito Prints by Philip West and Anthony Saunders.
Pack Price : £135.00
Saving : £145
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (D)

Quantity:
Mosquito Aircraft Prints by Philip West and Robert Taylor.
Pack Price : £150.00
Saving : £150
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Time To Go by Philip West.
Night Intruder by Robert Taylor.

Quantity:
Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.488 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 1st September 1941
Fate : Disbanded 26th April 1945

Ka ngarue ratau - We shake them

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.488 Sqn RNZAF

No.488 Sqn RNZAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.85 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 19th December 1975

Noctu diuque venamur - We hunt by day and night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.85 Sqn RAF

No.85 Sqn RAF

No. 85 Squadron was formed on the 1st of August 1917 at Uphaven. Shortly afterwards the squadron moved to Mousehold Heath nea Norwich under the command of Major R A Archer. The squadron transferred to Hounslow in November 1917 and in March 1918 received its new commander Major William Avery Bishop VC, DSO, MC. On 1st April 1918 No.85 Squadron was transferred into the new Royal Air Force and went to France in May1918 flying the Sopwith Dolphin and later SE5A's. 85 Squadron duties were fighter patrols and ground attack sorties over the western front until the end of the war. On 21st June 1918 Major Edward Mannock DSO MC became commanding officer. On the 26th July 1918 during a patrol with Lt DC Inglis over the front line Major Mannock failed to return and on the 18th of July 1919 Major Mannock was awarded a posthumous VC. No. 85 Squadron had 99 victories during their stint on the western front, returning to the UK in February 1919, and being disbanded on the 3rd of July 1919. 85 Squadron was reformed on June 1st, 1938, as part of A Flight of 87 Squadron based at RAF Debden commanded by Flight Lieutenant D E Turner. The squadron started training on the Gloster Gladiator until the 4th of September when Hawker Hurricanes were supplied. On the outbreak of World War Two the squadron moved to Boos as part of the Air Component of the BEF 60th Fighter Wing, and their Hurricanes were given the role to support the squadrons of Bristol Blenheims and Fairey Battles. By 1st November 85 Squadron's Hurricanes were moved to Lille Seclin. 85 Squadron scored its first victory of World War Two when Flight Lieutenant R.H.A. Lee attacked an He111 which crashed into the Channel, exploding on impact while on patrol over the Boulogne area. In May 1940, during the German advance, 85 Squadron were in combat constantly and over an 11 day period the squadron confirmed 90 enemy kills. When their operating airfields were overun the squadron's last remaining three Hurricanes returned to England. The squadron lost 17 pilots (two killed, six wounded and nine missing). During the Battle of Britian the squadron took part in the conflict over southern England and in October the Squadron moved to Yorkshire and were given the new role of night fighter patrols. 85 Squadron continued in the night fighter role for most of the war, with only a brief period as bomber support as part of 100 group.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Havoc



Click the name above to see prints featuring Havoc aircraft.

Manufacturer : Douglas

Havoc

A-20

Mosquito



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mosquito aircraft.

Manufacturer : De Havilland
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1955
Number Built : 7781

Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

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