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Special Sale Pack of 5 Prints - 4 FREE! - panzer-prints.com

DHM2662. Return of the Hunters by Nicolas Trudgian. <p> Messerschmitt Me262s of JG7 race back to their base at Brandenburg after intercepting a USAAF bomber raid on Munich, and Luftwaffe air bases in the area. Below them a B-26 has crash-landed in the fields still covered with a sprinkling of late winter snow. In the distance the afternoon sun glistens on the Bavarian Alpine mountains. <p><b>Last 2 copies available of this sold out edition. </b> <b><p>Signed by <a href=signatures.php?Signature=224>General Adolf Galland (deceased)</a>, <br><a href=signatures.php?Signature=237>Major Erich Rudorffer (deceased)</a><br> and <br><a href=signatures.php?Signature=699>Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)</a>. <p> Signed limited edition of 1250 prints. <p> Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (83cm x 61cm)
DHM6183F. The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman.<p> Having been initially intercepted by just three ageing Gloster Gladiators, who gallantly gave both the Germans and Italians the impression of a much bigger resistance in the skies above Malta, the Italian Air Force was suddenly confronted by the more capable Hawker Hurricanes of 261 (F) Sqn, commanded by Sqn Ldr D W Balden.  The previously unescorted bombers of the Regia Aeronautica suddenly required the presence of fighters to protect the marauding bombers, as depicted here, where Macchi  200s of 6° Gruppo 1° Stormo, reel around the sky to chase off the Hurricanes from the attacking Savoia Marchetti SM.79s above Grand Harbour in the summer of 1940. <b><p>Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints. <p>Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)
B0494D. LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman.<p> LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada. <b><p>Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints. <p>Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)
B0522D. Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.<p> Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.  <b><p>Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints. <p>Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)
DHM6202. Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman. <p> 6th June, 1944 - D-Day - and Martin B.26 Marauders of the 386th Bomb Group, 553rd Bomb Squadron are among the first aircraft to bomb the beaches in readiness for the Normandy landings on that momentous day.  Shown softening up the enemy gun emplacements on a low level run over Utah Beach is 131576 AN-Z, now on display at the Utah Beach Museum. <b><p>Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints. <p>Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)

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  Website Price: £ 310.00  

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Special Sale Pack of 5 Prints - 4 FREE!

DPK0808. Special Sale Pack of 5 Prints - 4 FREE!

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2662. Return of the Hunters by Nicolas Trudgian.

Messerschmitt Me262s of JG7 race back to their base at Brandenburg after intercepting a USAAF bomber raid on Munich, and Luftwaffe air bases in the area. Below them a B-26 has crash-landed in the fields still covered with a sprinkling of late winter snow. In the distance the afternoon sun glistens on the Bavarian Alpine mountains.

Last 2 copies available of this sold out edition.

Signed by General Adolf Galland (deceased),
Major Erich Rudorffer (deceased)
and
Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.

Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (83cm x 61cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM6183F. The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman.

Having been initially intercepted by just three ageing Gloster Gladiators, who gallantly gave both the Germans and Italians the impression of a much bigger resistance in the skies above Malta, the Italian Air Force was suddenly confronted by the more capable Hawker Hurricanes of 261 (F) Sqn, commanded by Sqn Ldr D W Balden. The previously unescorted bombers of the Regia Aeronautica suddenly required the presence of fighters to protect the marauding bombers, as depicted here, where Macchi 200s of 6° Gruppo 1° Stormo, reel around the sky to chase off the Hurricanes from the attacking Savoia Marchetti SM.79s above Grand Harbour in the summer of 1940.

Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints.

Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

B0494D. LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman.

LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints.

Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

B0522D. Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.

Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints.

Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)


Item #5 - Click to view individual item

DHM6202. Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman.

6th June, 1944 - D-Day - and Martin B.26 Marauders of the 386th Bomb Group, 553rd Bomb Squadron are among the first aircraft to bomb the beaches in readiness for the Normandy landings on that momentous day. Shown softening up the enemy gun emplacements on a low level run over Utah Beach is 131576 AN-Z, now on display at the Utah Beach Museum.

Artists Special Reserve of 50 prints.

Image size 12.5 inches x 8 inches (32cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 310.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £660.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £350




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo




General Adolf Galland (deceased)
Adolf Galland fought in the great Battles of Poland, France and Britain, leading the famous JG26 Abbeville Boys. He flew in combat against the RAFs best including Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. In 1941, at the age of 29, he was promoted to Inspector of the Fighter Arm. In 1942 Hitler personally selected Galland to organise the fighter escort for the Channel Dash. He became the youngest General in the German High Command but open disagreements with Goering led to his dismissal at the end of 1944. He reverted to combat flying, forming the famous JV44 wing flying the Me262 jet fighter, and was the only General in history to lead a squadron into battle. With 104 victories, all in the West, Adolf Galland received the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Born 19th March 1912, died 9th February 1996. Born in 1911, Adolf Galland learned to fly at a state-sponsored flying club in the early 1930s. In 1933 he was selected to go to Italy for secret pilot training. Galland flew for a brief time as a commercial airline pilot prior to joining the clandestine Luftwaffe as a Second Lieutenant. In April of 1935 he was assigned to JG-2, the Richtofen Fighter Wing, and in 1937 he joined the ranks of the Condor Legion flying the He-51 biplane fighter in support of General Franco during the Spanish Civil War. Despite flying 280 missions, Galland attained no aerial victories, a rather inauspicious start for a pilot would go on to attain more than 100 aerial victories - the highest for any pilot who flew on the Western Front. During Germanys invasion of Poland, Galland was assigned to an attack squadron and he flew over fifty ground sorties. He was promoted to Captain for his efforts, but Galland was anxious to return to a fighter squadron, and he got his wish in October of 1939 when he was transferred to JG-27. It was with JG-27 that Galland first learned to fly the Bf-109. In May of 1940 JG-27 flew in support of the invasion of Belgium, and Galland achieved his first combat victory on May 12. Two months later his score had risen to more than a dozen, and at this time he was once again transferred to JG-26 situated on the Channel Coast. Engaging the RAF on a daily basis during the Battle of Britain, Gallands score rose steadily until it exceeded 40 victories by September. After a short leave Galland rejoined JG-26 in Brittany, where the squadron played a defensive role. Following Germanys invasion of Russia in June of 1941, JG-26 became one of only two German fighter squadrons left on the Channel Coast. This resulted in plenty of flying, and by late in 1941 Gallands victory totals had reached 70. Following a near brush with death when the fuel tank of his 109 exploded, Galland was grounded for a time, and sent to Berlin where he was made the General of the Fighter Arm, reporting directly to Goring and Hitler. Galland spent most of the next few years carrying out inspection tours, and was at odds with his superiors about the need for an adequate fighter defense to negate ever-increasing Allied bombing of Germanys cities. He continued to fly combat missions when the opportunity presented itself, despite Gorings orders to the contrary. In January of 1945 almost 300 fighters were lost in an all-out attack on Allied airfields in France, a mission Galland did not support. He was dismissed as General of the Fighter Arm for his insubordination, but reflecting his flying abilities Hitler ordered Galland to organize JV-44, Germanys first jet-equipped fighter squadron. By March of 1945 Galland had recruited 45 of Germanys best surviving fighter pilots, and this new squadron was given the difficult task of trying to counter the daily onslaught of 15th Air Force bombers coming at Germany from the South. Gallands final mission of the War occurred on April 26 when he attained his 102nd and 103rd confirmed aerial victories prior to crash landing his damaged Me262. Several days later the War was over for both Galland and Germany. General Galland died in 1996.




Leutnant Fritz Tegtmeier (deceased)
Born in 1917 he joined 2/JG-54 in October 1940, but after being injured in a crash it wasn't until 1941 that he achieved his first victory. A brief time as a fighter Instructor in 1943 he returned to the Russian Front and his score soon started to mount, By May 1944 he had over 100 victories. August 1944 saw his appointment as Staffelkapitan of 3/JG-54. In March 1945 he transferred to JG-7 flying Me262 Jet. By the end of the war he had flown 700 combat missions and had 146 victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross. Fritz Tegtmeier died on 8th April 1999 aged 81.




Major Erich Rudorffer (deceased)
Erich Rudorffer was born on November 1st 1917 in the town of Zwickau in Saxony. Erich Rudorffer joined the Luftwaffes I./JG2 Richthofen in November 1939, and was soon flying combat patrols in January 1940 and was assigned to I/JG 2 Richthofen with the rank of Oberfeldwebel. He took part in the Battle of France, scoring the first of his many victories over a French Hawk 75 on May 14th, 1940. He went on to score eight additional victories during the Battle of France and the Battle of Britain. Rudorffer recalled an incident in August 1940 when he escorted a badly damaged Hurricane across the Channel - ditching in the English Channel was greatly feared by pilots on both sides. As fate often does, Rudorffer found the roles reversed two weeks later, when he was escorted by an RAF fighter after receiving battle damage. By May 1st 1941 Rudorffer had achieved 19 victories, which led to the award of the Knights Cross. In June 1941 Rodorffer became an Adjutant of II./JG2. In 1942 Rudorffer participated in Operation Cerberus (known as the Channel Dash) and flew over the Allied landings at Dieppe. Erich Rudorffer along with JG2 was transferred to North Africa in December 1942. It was in North Africa that Rudorffer showed his propensity for multiple-victory sorties. He shot down eight British aircraft in 32 minutes on February 9th 1943 and seven more in 20 minutes six days later. After scoring a total of 26 victories in Tunisia, Rudorffer returned to France in April 1943 and was posted to command II./JG54 in Russia, after Hauptmann Heinrich Jung, its Kommodore, failed to return from a mission on July 30th 1943. On August 24th 1943 he shot down 5 Russian aircraft on the first mission of the day and followed that up with three more victories on the second mission. He scored seven victories in seven minutes on October 11th but his finest achievement occurred on November 6th when in the course of 17 minutes, he shot down thirteen Russian aircraft. Rudorffer became known to Russian pilots as the fighter of Libau. On October 28th 1944 while about to land, Rudorffer spotted a large formation of Il-2 Sturmoviks. He quickly aborted the landing and moved to engage the Russian aircraft. In under ten minutes, nine of the of the II-2 Sturmoviks were shot down causing the rest to disperse. Rudorffer would later that day go on and shoot down a further two Russian aircraft. These victories took his total to 113 and he was awarded the Oak Leaves on April 11th 1944. Rudorffer would on the 26th January 1945 on his 210th victory receive the addition of the Swords. In February 1945 Rudorffer took command of I./JG7 flying the Me262. He was one of the first jet fighter aces of the war, scoring 12 victories in the Me262. He shot down ten 4-engine bombers during the "Defense of the Reich missions". He was the master of multiple scoring - achieving more multiple victories than any other pilot. Erich Rudorffer never took leave, was shot down 16 times having to bail out 9 times, and ended the war with 222 victories from over 1000 missions. He was awarded the Knights Cross, with Oak Leaves and Swords. Erich Rudorffer died on 8th April 2016.

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