Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Product Search         

Tiger Tank Prints by Nicolas Trudgian. - panzer-prints.com

DHM2035. Tigers in Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian. <p> The Battle for Point 112, a strategically positioned hill just a few miles south-west of Caen, was the scene of the most violent fighting between German and British armor, artillery and ground troops during the weeks immediately following the D-Day invasion, in June 1944.  Desperate to regain Hill 112, on July 9th, the Tiger tanks of SS Panzer Battalion 102 were ordered to advance.  2 Kompanies Tigers managed to occupy the eastern slopes of the hill, while 1 Kompanie came under fire as they rached the first houses in the small village of Maltot.  At this point they came head on to British Sherman tanks.  Entering the village firing his 88, Unterscharfuhrer Fey in tank 138 quickly knocked out three Shermans at 200 yards range, and by the evening of July 10th the Panzers had re-taken Maltot.  But Allied artillery had driven the Germans off Hill 112.  The battle raged on for another three weeks when on August 1st the Allies frove the Germans off Point 112 for the final time.  Tigers of SS Panzer Battalion 102 yet again advance towards the infamous hill, passing two Shermans knocked out in the previous days fighting. Overhead, Me109s of II./JG26 give aerial support as the German armour makes a last ditch attempt to repel the advancing forces, in their effort to hold the important city of Caen. <p><b>Two prints remaining only.</b><b><p>Signed by <a href=signatures.php?Signature=902>Oberstleutnant Alfred Rubbel</a>, <br><a href=signatures.php?Signature=903>Feldwebel Richard Schwarzmann (deceased)</a> <br>and <br><a href=signatures.php?Signature=904>Unteroffizier Dr Franz-Wilhelm Lochmann</a>.<p> Signed limited edition of 600 prints.  <p>Paper size 34 inches x 24 inches (86cm x 61cm)
DHM2609. Tiger! Tiger! by Nicolas Trudgian. <p> The infamous Tiger Tank, one of the the deadliest fighting machines ever built and the most successful tank ace of WWII, Michael Wittmann. Wittmanns Tiger advances towards Beauvais in June 1944 to intercept the advancing British 7th Armoured Division - the famous Desert Rats - during the Allied Invasion of Normandy. Awarded the Knights Cross with Swords and Oak Leaves, Michael Wittman was the most decorated tank commander of WWII but, together with his entire crew, lost his life on August 8 in the battle for Cintheaux when his Tiger received a direct hit from a rocket fired by an RAF Typhoon ground attack fighter.  <p> Please note the image size is smaller than the paper size by several inches. <p>Last 12 copies of this sold out edition.  <b><p> Signed by <a href=signatures.php?Signature=368>Obergefreiter Henry Metelmann (deceased)</a>. <p> Signed limited edition of 400 prints.  <p>Print paper size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)
DHM1778. Rearm and Resupply by David Pentland. <p> Albert Kerscher and Otto Carius. Kinderheim, Narva Bridgehead 17th March 1944, 2nd Kompany, 502 Heavy Tank Battalion. Tiger I tanks of Albert Kersher and Otto Carius, of 2nd Company. Heavy tank Battalion 502, pull back to their headquarters at The Kinderheim to reload ammunition and refuel for the next engagement. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)

Please note that our logo (below) only appears on the images on our website and is not on the actual art prints.


When you are ready to add this item to your basket, click the button below.

 

 

  Website Price: £ 270.00  

Quantity:
 

 

Tiger Tank Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.

PCK2409. Tiger Tank Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.

Military Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2035. Tigers in Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.

The Battle for Point 112, a strategically positioned hill just a few miles south-west of Caen, was the scene of the most violent fighting between German and British armor, artillery and ground troops during the weeks immediately following the D-Day invasion, in June 1944. Desperate to regain Hill 112, on July 9th, the Tiger tanks of SS Panzer Battalion 102 were ordered to advance. 2 Kompanies Tigers managed to occupy the eastern slopes of the hill, while 1 Kompanie came under fire as they rached the first houses in the small village of Maltot. At this point they came head on to British Sherman tanks. Entering the village firing his 88, Unterscharfuhrer Fey in tank 138 quickly knocked out three Shermans at 200 yards range, and by the evening of July 10th the Panzers had re-taken Maltot. But Allied artillery had driven the Germans off Hill 112. The battle raged on for another three weeks when on August 1st the Allies frove the Germans off Point 112 for the final time. Tigers of SS Panzer Battalion 102 yet again advance towards the infamous hill, passing two Shermans knocked out in the previous days fighting. Overhead, Me109s of II./JG26 give aerial support as the German armour makes a last ditch attempt to repel the advancing forces, in their effort to hold the important city of Caen.

Two prints remaining only.

Signed by Oberstleutnant Alfred Rubbel,
Feldwebel Richard Schwarzmann (deceased)
and
Unteroffizier Dr Franz-Wilhelm Lochmann.

Signed limited edition of 600 prints.

Paper size 34 inches x 24 inches (86cm x 61cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM2609. Tiger! Tiger! by Nicolas Trudgian.

The infamous Tiger Tank, one of the the deadliest fighting machines ever built and the most successful tank ace of WWII, Michael Wittmann. Wittmanns Tiger advances towards Beauvais in June 1944 to intercept the advancing British 7th Armoured Division - the famous Desert Rats - during the Allied Invasion of Normandy. Awarded the Knights Cross with Swords and Oak Leaves, Michael Wittman was the most decorated tank commander of WWII but, together with his entire crew, lost his life on August 8 in the battle for Cintheaux when his Tiger received a direct hit from a rocket fired by an RAF Typhoon ground attack fighter.

Please note the image size is smaller than the paper size by several inches.

Last 12 copies of this sold out edition.

Signed by Obergefreiter Henry Metelmann (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 400 prints.

Print paper size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM1778. Rearm and Resupply by David Pentland.

Albert Kerscher and Otto Carius. Kinderheim, Narva Bridgehead 17th March 1944, 2nd Kompany, 502 Heavy Tank Battalion. Tiger I tanks of Albert Kersher and Otto Carius, of 2nd Company. Heavy tank Battalion 502, pull back to their headquarters at The Kinderheim to reload ammunition and refuel for the next engagement.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)


Website Price: £ 270.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £550.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £280




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Feldwebel Richard Schwarzmann (deceased)
Conscripted in 1939 into the Wehrmacht he served first with Artillery Regiment 45 in the French campaigns of 1940 where he was wounded. Posted to the Panzer division in the East Front in 1941, in 1943 he joined Panzer Division 503. He was top marksman and Kommandant of both Tiger I and II. He was awarded the Iron Cross II.




Oberstleutnant Alfred Rubbel (deceased)
Alfred Rubbel was born in Tilsit on June 28, 1921, and volunteered for the Wehrmacht at the age of eighteen. After his basic training in the infantry replacement regiment 21 and his transfer to the armoured weapon, Alfred Rubbel began the Russian campaign on 22nd June 1942 in the 9th Panzer Regiment 29 of the 12th Panzer Division. First as a charge guard in the chief battalion, then as a guardsman, he experienced the rapid advance of the Army Group to the east. In the fighting around Leningrad on September 3rd, 1941, wounded by grenade splinters, he was transferred to the homeland. In January 1942 he returned to his unit, he took part in the fighting at the Volkhov. After refreshing and rebuilding his company in Silesia, he returned to Panzer Regiment 4 with the long-handled cannon to the Eastern Front. As an unofficial and tank commander, his path led him on a long Panzer raid to the West Caucasus, where the battles in Eastern Caucasus were connected between September and December 1942. In December 1942, he and his comrades in Putlos and Paderborn began the conversion to Panzer VI Tiger. Went to 503th Panzer Division 503, and set in the railway transport in the direction of Rostov, he took part in the retreat to the Dnieper and the battle for the Kessel of Cherkassy as a Panzer commander at Operation Zitadelle, the largest tank battle of the Second World War. After officers' training courses in Ohrdruf and Krampnitz in December 1944, he moved to the 3rd Panzer Division 503, he fought in the King (Tiger II) in Hungary and Austria. At the end of the war, lieutenant of the reserve Alfred Rubbel can look back on a total balance of 57 tank victories in 79 Panzer battles on 81 deployments in the tank and 41 months on the front. He was awarded the Iron Cross I and II. Rubbel was a close friend of Kurt Knispel, a fellow tank commander of Pz Abt 503 and top-scoring Panzer Ace.


Unteroffizier Dr Franz-Wilhelm Lochmann
Franz-Wilhelm Lochmann joined up in 1941, and trained and served as a tank radio operator and machine gunner in I./503 Heavy Tank Division. He fought in 95 tank engagements and finished the war as a Company Commander. He was awarded the Iron Cross I and II.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo


Obergefreiter Henry Metelmann (deceased)
Heinrich Friedrich Carl Metelmann was born on Christmas Day 1922 into a working-class family in Altona, an industrial town near Hamburg. His father, an unskilled railway worker, was a socialist. When Heinrich was 11, his Christian youth group was subsumed into the Hitler Youth, of which he was soon an enthusiastic member. Called up in 1941 when he reached 18, Henry Metelmann was posted to join the 22nd Panzer Division and was in training as Operation Barbarossa commenced in June. Shortly after the Division was sent to the Crimea for the winter of 1941 as part of Mannesteins 11th Army, fighting the first of many tank battles in the early spring of 1942. He took part in the push to the River V, and the approach to Stalingrad. But as they advanced the 1,000 miles towards Stalingrad, Metelmann who spoke a little Russian got to know some of the people whose homes he occupied: I fell in love with a Russian girl, although nothing ever came of it, and for the first time I began to doubt our racial superiority. How could I be better than her? His unit was nearly destroyed in the Russian pincer movement at Stalingrad in November 1942, and Metelmann only narrowly avoided being captured. Yet the reversal of the Wehrmacht's fortunes did not lead him to disobey orders. Wounded, he spent time in hospital before rejoining his unit for the Battle of Stalingrad. Detached from his unit during the chaos of the fighting, he walked west for days before crossing back into the German lines. Wounded again, he was captured while defending a small town on the Rhine. but escaped, and in early 1945 was sent to join a Panzer unit in the West defending the Rhine from the advancing US army under General Patton. Taken prisoner, Metelmann was shipped to America, where his turning point came en route to a prison camp in Arizona, when he picked up a magazine showing pictures of the piles of corpses and walking corpses at the newly liberated concentration camps. Metelmann had swallowed Nazi propaganda that the camps were merely places where unsocial elements were made to do a hard day' work. At first I said to my mates: 'Look, just because we lost the war, they blame us for everything.' But when he studied the pictures more closely he realised that they were not fabrications. Later Metelmann was transferred to England, where he remained a PoW until 1948, working as a farm labourer in Hampshire. By the time he returned to Germany, his parents were dead (his mother from Allied bombing). After just four weeks he returned to the farm in Hampshire, where was given his old job back. Later he took a job as a railway signalman and, on his retirement in 1987, Charterhouse offered him a job as groundsman. While several of Metelmann's old army comrades committed suicide, Metelmann joined the Communist Party and CND and became a committed peace activist. In the 1960s he protested against the Vietnam War. In recent years he attended all the Stop the War marches against the invasion of Iraq and protested against the American bombing of Afghanistan. Henry Metelmann died on July 24th 2011.

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page