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Liberation - Sainte Mere Eglise by Richard Taylor. (B) - panzer-prints.com

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Liberation - Sainte Mere Eglise by Richard Taylor. (B)


Liberation - Sainte Mere Eglise by Richard Taylor. (B)

For nearly four years, the swastika had flown belligerently over the small town of Sainte Mere Eglise in Normandy. Suddenly, shortly after midnight on the night of 5/6th June 1944, parachutists from the 82nd Airborne Division began landing in and around the town. By 04.30, after a tough fire fight, troopers from the 505th PIR had raised another flag over the town - the Stars and Stripes - and Sainte Mere Eglise had become the first town in Normandy to be liberated by the Allies on D-Day. Sherman tanks landing on nearby Utah beach with the US VII Corps were soon passing through the newly liberated town on the way to the front.
Item Code : DHM6006BLiberation - Sainte Mere Eglise by Richard Taylor. (B) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRESENTATION Normandy Veterans edition of 5 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 31.5 inches x 27 inches (81cm x 61cm) Megellas, James
Bearden, Bob
Schlesener, Milton
Rayner, Titch (companion print)
Whitbread, Alf (companion print)
Brewer, Ernie (companion print)
Gray, Billy (companion print)
Wheeler, Frank (companion print)
Compton, Buck (matted on companion print)
Guth, Forrest (matted on companion print)
Malarkey, Donald (matted on companion print)
+ Artist : Richard Taylor
SOLD
OUT
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Other editions of this item : Liberation - Sainte Mere Eglise by Richard Taylor.DHM6006
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 135 prints. Paper size 31.5 inches x 27 inches (81cm x 61cm) Megellas, James
Bearden, Bob
Schlesener, Milton
+ Artist : Richard Taylor
£50 Off!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : £110.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 31.5 inches x 27 inches (81cm x 61cm) Megellas, James
Bearden, Bob
Schlesener, Milton
+ Artist : Richard Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUE Limited edition of 25 remarques. Paper size 31.5 inches x 27 inches (81cm x 61cm) Megellas, James
Bearden, Bob
Schlesener, Milton
+ Artist : Richard Taylor
£295.00VIEW EDITION...
REMARQUE Limited edition of 10 double remarques. Paper size 31.5 inches x 27 inches (81cm x 61cm) Megellas, James
Bearden, Bob
Schlesener, Milton
+ Artist : Richard Taylor
£475.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details :
About this edition :

EXAMPLE OF COMPANION PENCIL DRAWING :

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Cpl Forrest Guth
Coming down, I had a malfunction of my parachute. It was twisted. The chute had not been properly packed. Or maybe it had been packed in damp conditions. We had not jumped high enough to be able to use the reserve. We had jumped under 500 feet. So my main chute opened but didn't open completely. You try to shake out the twist if you can, but there's so little time. I couldn't do a lot and came down fast. I just hoped for the best. I hit with a thud. I hit on my left hip and back and was knocked out. I donít remember much, just hitting hard and seeing stars. I was paralyzed in leg and back. I couldn't move. Medics came along, gave me a shot of morphine, and put me in a cattle barn. That was the extent of my fighting in Holland.


Flying Officer Frank Wheeler DFC (deceased)
Frank Wheeler joined the RAF in 1941, training in England as a pilot after which he completed a period of instructing. In January 1944 he was posted to join 174 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Westhampnett, his first operation being as an escort to the Mosquitos taking part in Operation Jericho, the Amiens Jailbreak. He stayed with 174 Squadron for the remainder of the War, serving throughout occupied Europe, and in 1945, at the end of his tour of operations, he was awarded the DFC. We have learned that Frank Wheeler sadly passed away in early 2013.
Gunner Ernie Brewer L d HonErnie Brewer landed on Gold Beach on D-Day with the 5th Battalion, Royal Horse Artillery, part of the 7th Armoured Division - the Desert Rats - equipped with Sexton 25pdr self-propelled guns.


Lieutenant Buck Compton (deceased)


Lt Col James Maggie Megellas
Commander of H Company, 3rd Battalion, 504th PIR, "Maggie" Megellas was the most decorated officer in the 82nd Airborne Division. After serving in Italy, where he was twice wounded, Megellas fought in Normandy before taking part in Operation Market Garden where he led his company in the crossing of the River Waal near Nijmegen. For bravery he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the second highest gallantry award. He fought with great distinction in the Battle of the Bulge, and on 28th January, whilst advancing into the town of Herresbach, his company succeeded in killing and capturing a large number of Germans. He single handedly destroyed a German tank with grenades before they seized the town, without losing a man. He was nominated for the Medal of Honor, but the account was never included in the official report.


Private Alf Whitbread (deceased)
Alf Whitbread, known in the war as "Lucky Jim" was born in Twickenham, London and when his father got a job in the Building Research Station in Garston the family moved to Watford. Alf Whitbread left school to become a machine engineer, but was encouraged to volunteer for the army after hearing a patriotic speech on the radio. On June 19th, 1940, Alf Whitbread went to the Edgeware recruiting office and joined the Royal West Kent Youth Battalion at the age of 18 and in 1942 in Ireland, Alf heard rumours about a newly formed airborne unit and volunteered. Alf said : "We thought we were going to be in the paratroopers, who were mad, but we finished up in the gliders and the paratroopers thought we were mad." Alf Served with 17 Platoon of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. He landed as part of the Coup de Main operation on Glider No.6 into Pegasus bridge in the early hours of D-Day. Alf was part of the second group of gliders which landed first at Horsa Bridge, before taking part in the battle for Pegasus Bridge, (the subject of the film "The Longest Day".) They sent the message "ham and jam", a code confirming they had captured both bridges. The men held off many counter attacks by German troops and tanks until midday on June 6th. Alf would later say "Two of our gliders were sent to secure Horsa bridge and frankly, it was a walk over. Our platoon never lost a man. We secured the bridge and then, when another platoon relieved us, we went and joined John Howard on Pegasus Bridge." Alf Whitbread was later to take part in Operation Varsity, the last major battle of the war in Europe. On March 24th 1945 Operation Varsity was launched. The aim was to take a bridge over the Rhine again by gliderborne troops. Almost 1,500 men of the Ox and Bucks died during the operation, and Lucky Jim lived up to his reputation before his glider even landed. Alf would say: "They say dont volunteer for anything, but I did and it worked out to my benefit. I remember when we were set to get on a glider on the way for the Rhine crossing and it was too full. I was detailed to another glider. They both crash landed. All the troops in the first glider were killed. Only three of us got out of the other glider alive, after it broke in half." After the war Alf Whitbread joined London Transport as an engineer for 40 years and in all that time Alf never took a day off due to illness. With great sadness we have been told that Alf has passed away peacefully on 19th March 2011 at the age of 88. Cranston Fine Arts feel very honoured to have had Alf sign some of our art prints.
Private Billy GrayThe first man out of Glider No. 1 into Pegasus Bridge as part of the Coup de Main operation in the early hours of D-Day. He served with 25 Platoon of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.


Sergeant Donald Malarkey


Sergeant Titch Rayner
Titch Rayner served with the British Parachute Regiment. On D-Day he was flown into France on Horsa glider No.4, which landed off target due to a navigational problem. With the element of surprise gone, he and his fellow Paras had to fight their way through to Pegasus Bridge.


Sgt Bob Bearden
Bob was the leader of H Company mortar squad, 507th PIR, attached to the 82nd Airborne. The 507th arrived over Normandy two hours later than other airborne units without the element of surprise. Massive anti-aircraft fire and dense cloud caused them to have the worst drop of all, with most sticks missing their drop zones, stranded in isolated groups, or with their drop zone flooded by the Germans. Bob Bearden fought with a group of about 50 troopers from various units, taking the small town of Fresville, before being forced to retire due to overwhelming odds. In a brave action which left 20 Germans dead in his wake, Bob was captured by the Germans and then taken prisoner. He was freed by Russians in late December 1944.


Sgt Milton Schlesener
Milton Schlesener served with D Company, 505th PIR, and participated in an amazing four combat jumps from D-Day with the 505th Regiment. He served with the 82nd Airborne all the way from Normandy to Germany, and the end of the war.

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