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Nicolas Trudgian World War Two Art Prints. - panzer-prints.com

DHM2585. Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian. <p>Of the many famous combat aircraft to serve their respective countries in the Second World War, two perhaps more than any others, created huge impact and consternation upon seasoned opposing pilots when they first appeared on the battlefront - the Supermarine Spitfire and the Messerschmitt Me262.  Both in their day represented enormous advances in aircraft design and power, and both have continued to capture the imagination of aviation enthusiasts ever since.  As the war progressed the Spitfire continually upgraded its performance and by the time the Luftwaffes new Me262 turbo-jet arrived on the scene the sleek new Mk XIV, powered by the awesome Griffon engine, was among the fastest piston-engine fighters of the war.  The stage was set for a clash between the most powerful piston-engine fighter and the worlds first turbojet, and it was not long before the pilots of these two most advanced combat aircraft met in the hostile skies over western Europe. Ill-advisedly employed by Hitler as the wonder-bomber, the Me262 was initially issued to Bomber Units, one of which being KG51. Tasked with undertaking lightning fast raids upon advancing Allied ground forces, the shark-like jets employed their spectacular speed advantage to surprise, strike and escape. Not to be outdone, the RAF responded with their supremely fast Spitfire XIVs which had already proven themselves highly effective against Germanys V1 flying bombs. In his painting, Nick Trudgian recreates a typical moment: Spitfire Mk XIVs of 41 Squadron have intercepted and damaged a Me262 of KG51 and, with smoke and debris pouring from its damaged Jumo 004 Turbojet, the stricken Luftwaffe jet will be lucky to make it home. A dramatic painting and a fine tribute to the RAFs contribution to the Victory in Europe. <p><b>Last 35 available of this sold out edition.<b><p> Signatories: Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry; Wg Cdr J Elkington; Sqn Ldr Norman Scrivener (deceased); Flt Lt James Kyle DFM; Flt Lt Bertie Boulter DFC. <p> Anniverssary Edition : Signed  limited edition of 350 prints. <p> Print paper size 35.5 inches x 27 inches (90cm x 69cm)
DHM2261. End Game by Nicolas Trudgian. <p> For bomber crews, any daylight-bombing mission almost certainly meant combat. If it werent the attentions of determined Luftwaffe fighter pilots, it would be an aerial carpet of flak that welcomed the bombers en route to the target - and again on the journey home. On most missions the Eighth Air Force aircrews had to contend with both. Enduring up to ten hours of concentrated flying under cramped conditions, extreme cold, with the constant noise and vibration produced by four powerful engines, made every mission uncomfortable enough without being shot at. But the USAAF aircrews confronted the odds - a one in three chance of completing a 25-mission tour of operations - cheerfully and with gallant resolve. Playing a major role in the great raids on Germany and other targets in occupied Europe from early in 1944, equipped with the Consolidated B-24 Liberator, the USAAF Second Air Division flew no fewer than 95,048 sorties. Based in Norfolk, England, the crews also attacked targets far distant in Norway, Poland and Rumania, unloading almost 100,000 tons of bombs and claiming over 1000 enemy fighters shot down. <br><br><b>Published 2001.</b><b><p> Signed by S/Sgt Vernon R Swain, <br>Captain George E Hammond, <br>T/Sgt Perry Morse, <br>Lt Col James P Dyke, <br>Colonel Charles H Booth, <br>Lt Col Robert Dubowsky (deceased), <br>S/Sgt C W Will Lundy, <br>Captain Everett R Jones, <br>Captain J Richard Butler <br>and <br>Lt Col Elmo W Geppelt, in addition to the artist.<p> Signed limited edition of 600 prints.<p>  Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm)
B0305. Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 by Ivan Berryman. <p> Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 of 10 Staffel, Natchjagdgeschwader 11. <b><p>Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.<p>Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)

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Nicolas Trudgian World War Two Art Prints.

PCK1370. Nicolas Trudgian World War Two Art Prints.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2585. Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.

Of the many famous combat aircraft to serve their respective countries in the Second World War, two perhaps more than any others, created huge impact and consternation upon seasoned opposing pilots when they first appeared on the battlefront - the Supermarine Spitfire and the Messerschmitt Me262. Both in their day represented enormous advances in aircraft design and power, and both have continued to capture the imagination of aviation enthusiasts ever since. As the war progressed the Spitfire continually upgraded its performance and by the time the Luftwaffes new Me262 turbo-jet arrived on the scene the sleek new Mk XIV, powered by the awesome Griffon engine, was among the fastest piston-engine fighters of the war. The stage was set for a clash between the most powerful piston-engine fighter and the worlds first turbojet, and it was not long before the pilots of these two most advanced combat aircraft met in the hostile skies over western Europe. Ill-advisedly employed by Hitler as the wonder-bomber, the Me262 was initially issued to Bomber Units, one of which being KG51. Tasked with undertaking lightning fast raids upon advancing Allied ground forces, the shark-like jets employed their spectacular speed advantage to surprise, strike and escape. Not to be outdone, the RAF responded with their supremely fast Spitfire XIVs which had already proven themselves highly effective against Germanys V1 flying bombs. In his painting, Nick Trudgian recreates a typical moment: Spitfire Mk XIVs of 41 Squadron have intercepted and damaged a Me262 of KG51 and, with smoke and debris pouring from its damaged Jumo 004 Turbojet, the stricken Luftwaffe jet will be lucky to make it home. A dramatic painting and a fine tribute to the RAFs contribution to the Victory in Europe.

Last 35 available of this sold out edition.

Signatories: Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry; Wg Cdr J Elkington; Sqn Ldr Norman Scrivener (deceased); Flt Lt James Kyle DFM; Flt Lt Bertie Boulter DFC.

Anniverssary Edition : Signed limited edition of 350 prints.

Print paper size 35.5 inches x 27 inches (90cm x 69cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM2261. End Game by Nicolas Trudgian.

For bomber crews, any daylight-bombing mission almost certainly meant combat. If it werent the attentions of determined Luftwaffe fighter pilots, it would be an aerial carpet of flak that welcomed the bombers en route to the target - and again on the journey home. On most missions the Eighth Air Force aircrews had to contend with both. Enduring up to ten hours of concentrated flying under cramped conditions, extreme cold, with the constant noise and vibration produced by four powerful engines, made every mission uncomfortable enough without being shot at. But the USAAF aircrews confronted the odds - a one in three chance of completing a 25-mission tour of operations - cheerfully and with gallant resolve. Playing a major role in the great raids on Germany and other targets in occupied Europe from early in 1944, equipped with the Consolidated B-24 Liberator, the USAAF Second Air Division flew no fewer than 95,048 sorties. Based in Norfolk, England, the crews also attacked targets far distant in Norway, Poland and Rumania, unloading almost 100,000 tons of bombs and claiming over 1000 enemy fighters shot down.

Published 2001.

Signed by S/Sgt Vernon R Swain,
Captain George E Hammond,
T/Sgt Perry Morse,
Lt Col James P Dyke,
Colonel Charles H Booth,
Lt Col Robert Dubowsky (deceased),
S/Sgt C W Will Lundy,
Captain Everett R Jones,
Captain J Richard Butler
and
Lt Col Elmo W Geppelt, in addition to the artist.

Signed limited edition of 600 prints.

Image size 28 inches x 16 inches (71cm x 41cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

B0305. Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 by Ivan Berryman.

Messerschmitt Me262B-1a/U1 of 10 Staffel, Natchjagdgeschwader 11.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Website Price: £ 230.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £600.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £370




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Flight Lieutenant James Kyle DFM
James Kyle joined the RAF in 1941 and trained as a pilot in Dallas, Texas, before returning home to become a member of 197 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Drem upon its formation. In March 1943 the Squadron moved to Tangmere, and he became one of a precious few survivors of a full tour of operations, being awarded the DFM in 1944. He was demobilised in 1947 as a flight commander with 80 Tempest Fighter Squadron in Germany. He spent some years away from the service but the urge to fly never left and he rejoined the RAF in 1951 and became a Qualified Flying Instructor. He retired in 1974 after 30 years service.


Flt Lt Bertie Boulter DFC
Joining the RAF in July 1941, Bertie completed pilot training in the USA before returning to the UK in 1942, joining Coastal Command flying Ansons and Blackburn Bothas, and instructing on the use of radar. Converting to Blenheims he joined 1655 Squadron at Warboys, and began training on Mosquitos. In early 1944 he was selected for the Pathfinders, joining 128 Squadron flying Mosquitos from Wyton, then becoming part of the Light Night Strike Force with 163 Squadron, completing almost 50 operations. In early 1945 he was posted to Canada to ferry back Mosquitos but the war ended.


Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry
Hugh Parry joined the RAF from Northern Rhodesia in December 1939, and after training in England was posted in February 1941 to join 260 Squadron flying Hurricanes. In April he transferred to 266 Squadron flying first Spitfires and then Typhoons. In March 1943 he went to Malta with 601 Squadron on the USS Wasp, flying the Spitfire Vc, where he remained until July. After a spell as a test pilot, he returned to combat with 41 Squadron flying Spitfire MkXIIs. On 24th September 1943 he was shot down near Beauvais and managed to evade capture for the next five months until he was eventually captured by the Gestapo in Paris. After a month in prison he was sent to Stalag Luft III until the end of the war.




Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener DSO DFC(deceased)
One of the top RAF navigators of the war who went on more than 100 sorties in Bomber Command. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was born in Birmingham in November 1915 and joined the Royal Air Force in early 1939. Norman Scrivener trained at Staverton Aerodrome, in Gloucestershire, where he discovered he suffered from air sickness. He joined 97 (New Zealand ) Squadron, became a pilot officer and was one of the first navigators to use the developing radar systems and later flew with Wing Commander Guy Gibson (before Gibson moved to the Dambusters.) with 106 Squadron and in 1943 joined the Pathfinders of 83 Squadron as navigator to the Squadron Commander John Searby and took part in the raid on the German radar facilities in Peenemunde where the German V2 and V1 rockets were produced and tested. Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Distinguished Flying Order. Sadly Squadron Leader Norman Scrivener died in Worcester aged 91 in May 2007.




Wing Commander John Elkington
John (Tim) Elkington was born in 1920 and joined the RAF in September 1939. Commissioned as a Pilot Officer in July 1940 he was immediately posted to join 1 Squadron flying Hurricanes atTangmere. On 15 August he shot down an Me109 over the Channel, but the following day he was himself shot down over Thorney Island. He baled out injured and was admitted to hospital, his Hurricane crashing at Chidham.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo
Captain Everett R Jones
Captain George E Hammond




Captain J Richard Butler
"Dick" Butler joined the service in January 1942 and was posted to the 44th Bomb Group, with whom he flew B-24s throughout the war. His first combat mission was in April 1943 and he saw action in Europe, North Africa and the Mediterranean. On the Ploesti Raid, Dick was co-pilot of "Earthquake McGoon". Badly damaged and flying at tree-top height it was only the skill of Dick and pilot Walter Burke that kept "Earthquake" in the air and brought the crew home.
Colonel Charles H BoothCharles Booth entered the military in July 1941, two years after he received a pilots license. Pilots such as Wylie Post and Charles Lindbergh were Booths idols. Charles Booth was a major in the Army Air Force on March 8, 1944, when he, as command pilot, led one section of a heavy bombardment group on a mission against military installations in Germany. When anti-aircraft fire struck his B-24 Liberator above Hanover, Booth was still about an hour of flight time from his destination of Berlin. Wounded in both legs and one hand, Booth dragged himself to the flight deck and continued to direct the battle against enemy fighter attacks until the bombing run ended about two hours later, according to an award citation. The March 1944 mission to Berlin was only his second. He flew 28 more before his service in the war ended.


Lt Col Elmo W Geppelt
Lt Elmo W. Geppelt was the DR Navigator. He had trained with the crew in the States and had flown to England with them. Geppelt was elevated to Assistant Squadron Navigator for the 755th in December 1944, completing his tour in February 1945.
Lt Col James P Dyke
Lt Col Robert Dubowsky (deceased)Bob was born on the 19th of February 1921 in Mineola, NY. After graduating from high school at 18, he embarked on an ambitious coast to coast road trip in 1931. Robert Dubowsky attended Hofstra College and enlisted in the US Army Air Corp and while waiting to be called up he worked for Grumman. He became a B24 bomber pilot during WWII and flew 35 missions out of East Anglia, England. His first mission was on July 20th, 1944 and he completed his last mission March 24th, 1945. He was shot down on mission 33 on January 16, 1945 en route to a bombing raid on Dresden, Germany but all crew members survived. He received the DFC, Air Medal, 4 OLC commendation medals, and the Purple Heart. Dubowsky held a BS in Military Science from the University of Maryland. Finally retiring from the military in 1964 he went onto a career in the Civil Service at the Eastern Test Range as a down range manager for multiple missile projects over a period of 20 years. Robert Dubowsky passed away peacefully at home on February 5th, 2011.
S/Sgt C W Will Lundy
S/Sgt Vernon R Swain
T/Sgt Perry Morse

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