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A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders. - panzer-prints.com

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A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders.

A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders.

The relieved but weary crew members of Ol Gappy of the 379th Bomb Group, as they nurse their battle scarred B-17G back to their base at Kimbolton. Close behind them, the remainder of the group, relieved to see familiar territory, makes its final approach after the grueling mission to Meresburg on 11 September 1944.
Item Code : DHM1795A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders. - This Edition
PRINTSigned limited edition of 400 prints.

Paper size 26.5 inches x 19.5 inches (67cm x 50cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Spivey, Leonard L
Gossmann, Robert
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
£50 Off!
Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : £95.00

EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!

Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.

This complimentary art print worth £50
(Size : 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


Buy With :
Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.
for £145 -
Save £140

Buy With :
Deadly Pass by David Pentland.
for £115 -
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Buy With :
Heaven Can Wait by Nicolas Trudgian.
for £200 -
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Buy With :
Clash of Eagles by Anthony Saunders.
for £190 -
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Flying Fortress B-17 Aviation Art Prints.

Pack price : £320 - Save £425

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4 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £320 - Save £425

Titles in this pack :
Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.  (View This Item)
A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders.  (View This Item)
Heaven Can Wait by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
A Green Hill Far Away by Robert Tomlin.  (View This Item)
Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : A Welcome Return by Anthony Saunders. DHM1795
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs. Paper size 26.5 inches x 19.5 inches (67cm x 50cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Spivey, Leonard L
Gossmann, Robert
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
£15 Off!Now : £140.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTLimited edition of 25 remarques. Paper size 26.5 inches x 19.5 inches (67cm x 50cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Spivey, Leonard L
Gossmann, Robert
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
£300.00VIEW EDITION...
Signed limited edition of 400 prints.

Paper size 26.5 inches x 19.5 inches (67cm x 50cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Spivey, Leonard L
Gossmann, Robert
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders

Now : £140.00VIEW EDITION...
Signed limited edition of 400 prints. Paper size 26.5 inches x 19.5 inches (67cm x 50cm) Image size 21.5 inches x 14 inches (54cm x 36cm) Spivey, Leonard L
Gossmann, Robert
+ Artist : Anthony Saunders
£75 Off!Now : £70.00
Better Than
Half Price!

Signatures on this item

First Lieutenant Leonard L Spivey
Leonard Spivey joined the USAAF in 1942 and trained as a navigator, joining the Eighth Air Force in May 1943. He was posted to fly B-17 Fortresses with the 281st Bomb Group at Ridgewell in Essex, where as the Squadron Navigator he was the Group lead navigator on most of his missions, and on one was Wing lead. On 19th August 1943 he was shot down over Holland on his 13th mission, parachuting out of his B-17 and captured immediately by German forces. He was paraded through the streets in front of Dutch civilians, who incensed the Germans by displaying their support for this Allied airman. Leonard was sent as a POW to Stalag Luft III, made famous by the book and movie The Great Escape, and remained a POW until liberated by the US Army on 29th April 1945.

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Gossman
Bob Gossman joined the USAAF in March 1943, and after training was posted to England as a B-17 pilot with the 8th Air Force. Here he oined the 351st Bomb Group, 508th Bomb Squadron, based at Polebrook, Northamptonshire. He flew his first combat mission from there in January 1944, and later took part on a mission to Berlin with over 1300 bombers. After the war in Europe he went on to fly 58 missions in Korea, and another 30 missions in Vietnam. He retired from the Air Force in 1984.

The Aircraft :
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

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