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Typhoon

Manufacturer : Hawker
Number Built : 3330
Production Began : 1941
Retired :
Type : Fighter

Single engine fighter with a maximum speed of 412 mph at 19,000 feet and a ceiling of 35,200 feet. range 510 miles. The Typhoon was armed with twelve browning .303inch machine guns in the wings (MK1A) Four 20mm Hispano cannon in wings (MK!B) Two 1000ilb bombs or eight 3-inch rockets under wings. The first proto type flew in February 1940, but due to production problems the first production model flew in May 1941. with The Royal Air Force receiving their first aircraft in September 1941. Due to accidents due to engine problems (Sabre engine) The Hawker Typhoon started front line service in December 1941.The Hawker Typhoon started life in the role of interceptor around the cost of England but soon found its real role as a ground attack aircraft. especially with its 20mm cannon and rockets. This role was proved during the Normandy landings and the period after. The total number of Hawker typhoons built was 3,330.

Typhoon


Latest Typhoon Artwork Releases !
 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to - and after - D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island.

Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Spitfire, Typhoon and Mosquito aircraft in a triple print made up of the three individual prints <i>MkIX Spitfire, June 1944</i>, <i>Hawker Typhoons</i> and <i>De Havilland Mosquito</i>.

Royal Air Force WW2 Aircraft Triptych by Barry Price.
 146 Wing Hawker Typhoons were busy throughout the winter of 1944 / 45, carrying out a wide variety of missions and operations using a combination of rockets and bombs.  Here, Wing Commander J R Baldwin OC of 146 Wing escorts a damaged wingman home as they enter the holding pattern to begin finals into their base at Antwerp.  Baldwin's aircraft is Mk 1B PD521, carrying his personal markings JBII on the nose.

A Friend in Need by Ivan Berryman.
 Whilst attacking a temporary airfield North of Stendal on 22nd April 1945, a group of 198 Sqn Typhoons led by Sqn Ldr N J Durrant were surprised to find themselves confronted by that rarest of fighters, Focke-Wulf's awesome Ta.152, one of them piloted by the great Willi Reschke of Stab / JG301, flying 'Black 13'. In the words of Sqn Ldr Durrant: <i>'The first wave of Typhoons had broken up the airfield surface with 500lb bombs and started some fires.  I spotted some of the enemy trying to get airborne through the smoke and as I made a low pass, another Focke-Wulf passed me from behind at great speed.  Thinking this would be an easy 'kill', I fired a short burst, but the enemy was gone. I remember thinking that there must be something wrong with my own machine because I felt like I was standing still. Only later did I learn what we had encountered. Thank God the war ended when it did.'</i>

No Contest by Ivan Berryman.

Typhoon Artwork Collection



Hawker Typhoon Mk Ib R7752 PR-G. by M A Kinnear.


Typhoon Attack by Robert Taylor.


Typhoon Season by Ivan Berryman.

Typhoons on the Offensive by Richard Ward


F/Lt J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.


Hard Hitter by Ivan Berryman.


Airborne in JB1 by Ivan Berryman.


Red Section Scramble by Ivan Berryman.


3 Squadron Typhoon, Operation ELLAMY, Libya 2011 by Ivan Berryman.


Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman.


Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.


JBII - Hawker Typhoon of Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.


Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.


Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.


Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea.


Glosters Return by David Griffin


Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.


Typhoon! by Ivan Berryman.


A Busy Day at the Office by Ivan Berryman.


Wing Commander J R Baldwin - The Spoils of War by Ivan Berryman.


Operation Bodenplatte by Nicolas Trudgian.


Typhoon Country by Nicolas Trudgian.


Typhoons Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.


Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.


Typhoons at Falaise by Nicolas Trudgian.


Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor.

Typhoon Scramble by Stephen Brown.


Typhoon Attack by John Young.


Winter Warriors by Ivan Berryman.


Return of the Hunters by Anthony Saunders.


Snowbound - Tribute to No.439 Sqn RCAF by Ivan Berryman.


No Contest by Ivan Berryman.


A Friend in Need by Ivan Berryman.


Royal Air Force WW2 Aircraft Triptych by Barry Price.


Unhappy New Year by David Pentland.


Striking Back by Gerald Coulson.


Typhoon Scramble by Michael Turner.


Hawker Typhoon Squadron by Frank Wootton.

Rocket Firing Typhoons at the Falaise Gap - Normandy 1944 by Frank Wootton.

Typhoon Legacy by Michael Rondot.

Hawker Typhoons by Barry Price.

In Peaceful Skies (Hawker Typhoon) by Brian Robinson.

Typhoon and Tempest Aces of World War Two.


The Dreaded Salvo by Robin Smith.

Top Aces for : Typhoon
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Billy Drake24.50The signature of Billy Drake features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
J R Baldwin15.00
Hugh Spencer Leslie Dundas11.00The signature of Hugh Spencer Leslie Dundas features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Gordon Sinclair10.00The signature of Gordon Sinclair features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Dennis Crowley-Milling8.00The signature of Dennis Crowley-Milling features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
James Douglas Lindsay7.00The signature of James Douglas Lindsay features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Basil Gerald 'Stapme' Stapleton6.00The signature of Basil Gerald 'Stapme' Stapleton features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
John Harry Stafford5.00The signature of John Harry Stafford features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Squadrons for : Typhoon
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

124 Wing

Country : UK

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124 Wing

Full profile not yet available.

No.1 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

In Omnibus Princeps - First in all things

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No.1 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.137 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Do right, fear naught

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No.137 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.164 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 6th April 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1946
Argentine British

Firmes Volamos - Firmly we fly

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No.164 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.168 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th June 1942
Fate : Disbanded 26th February 1945

Rerum cognoscere causas - To know the cause of things.

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No.168 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.174 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 20th April 1946
Mauritius

Attack

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No.174 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.175 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Stop at nothing

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No.175 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.181 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Irruimus vastatum - We rush in and destroy

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No.181 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.182 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1945

Fearless I direct my flight

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No.182 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.183 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1942
Fate : Disbanded 15th November 1945
Gold Coast

Versatility

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No.183 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.184 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1942
Fate : Disbanded 29th August 1945

Nihil impenetrabile - Nothing impenetrable

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No.184 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.186 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 31st December 1918
Fate : Disbanded 17th July 1945

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No.186 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.193 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th December 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1945
Fellowship of the Bellows

Aera et terram imperare - To govern the air and the earth

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No.193 Sqn RAF

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No.195 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 16th November 1942
Fate : Disbanded 14th August 1945

Velocitate fortis - Strong by speed

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No.195 Sqn RAF

195 Squadron was formed at Duxford, Cambridgeshire on the 16th of November 1942, as an army support squadron equipped with Hawker Typhoons. 195 Squadron was disbanded in February 1944 but in October 1944 195 Squadron was reformed as a heavy -bomber squadron at Witchford, Cambridgeshire and equipped with Avro Lancasters. No.195 Squadron flew its first operational mission on 26th October 1944 bombing Leverkusen and in total flew some 1384 sorties against the enemy and dropped 6,144.6 tons of bombs by the end of the war. After their final mission on the 24th April 1945 against the Railway facilities at Bad Oldesloe, 195 squadron dropped supplies to the Dutch at The Hague on the 7th of May 1945 and flew home POWs back form France and British troops home from Italy. The squaodron was disbanded in August 1945.

No.198 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st June 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th September 1945

Igni renatus - Born again in fire

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No.198 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.245 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 18th April 1963
Northern Rhodesia

Fugo non fugio - I put to fight, I do not flee

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No.245 Sqn RAF

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No.247 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1963
China-British

Rise from the east

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No.247 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.257 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1963
Burma

Thay myay gyee shin shwe hti - Death or glory

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No.257 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.263 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 27th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1963

Ex ungue leonem - From his claws one knows the lion

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No.263 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.266 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 27th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1964
Rhodesia

Hlabezulu - The stabber of the sky

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No.266 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.295 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 3rd August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st October 1948

In caelo auxilium - Aid from the skies,/i>

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No.295 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.3 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

Tertius primus erit - The Third shall be first

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No.3 Sqn RAF

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No.33 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916

Loyalty

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No.33 Sqn RAF

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No.438 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 10th November 1943
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945
Wildcat

Going down

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No.438 Sqn RCAF

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No.439 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 31st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Fangs of death

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No.439 Sqn RCAF

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No.440 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 8th February 1944
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945
City of Ottawa

Ka Ganawaitah Saguenay - He who guards the Saguenay

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No.440 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.485 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 1st March 1941
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Ka whawhai tonu - We will fight on

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No.485 Sqn RNZAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.486 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 7th September 1945

Hiwa hau Maka - Beware of the wild winds

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No.486 Sqn RNZAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.504 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th March 1928
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Nottingham (Auxiliary)

Vindicat in ventis - It avenges in the wind

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No.504 Sqn RAF

504 (County of Nottingham) Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force: 504 Squadron came into being on the 14th March 1926 based at Hucknell as part of the Special Reserve Squadron in the light bomber role. The squadron was equipped with Horsleys, Wallaces and Hinds before becoming a fighter squadron equipped with Gloster Gauntlets on 31st October 1938. By the beginning of World War II, 504 had been re-equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. The squadrons first victory was a Ju88 shot down over France on May 14th 1940 where it had been sent as a BEF reinforcement. After suffering heavy losses in France, 504 was sent back to Wick in the UK and began to build itself back to operational strength. On 5th September 1940 504 flew to Hendon and began intensive operations attacking German formations over London and the South East of England during the Battle of Britain. During 1941, 504 was re-equipped with Mk IIb Hurricanes and then divided. A flight joining No.81 squadron to go to Russian and a new 504 squadron being built up from B flight. 504 squadron saw action throughout World War II, taking part in offensive fighter sweeps over occupied Europe, escorting transport aircraft to Arnhem and bomber escort duties. During January 1945, six pilots were posted to Glosters for conversion to the Meteor, but the war ended in Europe before they could be used in combat. On 16th December 1947 King George VI gave permission for the use of the Royal prefix for all Auxiliary Air Force squadrons. On 12th February 1957 504 squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force based at RAF Wyneswold was disbanded.

No.56 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 9th June 1916
Punjab

Quid si coelum ruat - What if heaven falls

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No.56 Sqn RAF

56 Squadron was formed on 8th June 1916 and in April 1917 was posted to France as part of the Royal Flying Corps. 56 squadron was equipped with the new SE5 fighter. One of the major aerial combats of the squadron was the shooting down of Lt Werner Voss. By the end of the first world war 56 Squadron had scored 402 victories, and many famous fighter aces flew with 56 Squadron including James McCudden, Reginald Hoidge, Gerald Maxwell, Arthur Rhys-Davies, Geoffrey Hilton Bowman, Richard Mayberry, Leonard Monteagle Barlow, Cyril Crowe, Maurice Mealing, Albert Ball, Harold Walkerdine, William Roy Irwin, Eric Broadberry, Kenneth William Junor, Cecil Leiws, Keith Muspratt, Duncan Grinnell-Milne, William Spurret Fielding-Johnson, William Otway Boger, Charles Jeffs, and Harold Molyneux. The squadron lost 40 pilots during the first world war with another twenty wounded and thirty one taken prisoner. When world war two broke out on the 6th of September 1939, 56 Squadron was based at North Weald. 56 Squadron flew Hurricanes during the Battle of France and during the Battle of Britain. 56 Squadron claimed just over 100 enenmy aircraft shot down during 1940. In 1941 as part of the Duxford Wing it was the first squadron to be equipped with the new Hawker Typhoon and during 1942 and 1943 was based ay RAF Matlaske as part of No.12 Group. No 56 Squadron was the frist squadron to confirm a victory while flying the Hawker Typhoon. In 1944 56 Squadron moved to RAF Newchurch and was re equipped with the new Hawker Tempest V, becoming part of the No.150 Wing under the command of the Ace Wing Commander Roland Beamont. 56 Squadron's new role was to defend Britian against the V1 flying bombs, and the squadron shot down around 75 V1s. The squadron moved to Europe on the 28th of September 1944 to Grimbergen in Belgium as part fo 122 Wing of the Second Tactical Air Force. During this period to the end of the war 56 Squadron became joint top scorers with a total of 149 aircraft cliamed. Over its history the squadron flew, SE5's Sopwith Snipes, Gloster Grebes, Armstrong Whitworth Siskins, Bristol Bulldogs, Gloster Gauntlets, Gloster Gladiators, Harker Hurricanes, Hawker Typhoon, and Hawker Tempests. Battle of Honours of the Squadron are : Western front 1917 - 1918 , Arras, Ypres 1917, Cambrai 1917, Soome 1918, Amiens, Hindenburg Line. During World war two : France and the Low Countries 1940, Battle of Britian, Fortress Europe 1942 - 1944, Dieppe, France, Germany 1944 - 1945, Home Defence 1942 - 1945 and Arnhem.

No.609 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th February 1936
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
West Riding (Auxiliary)

Tally ho!

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No.609 Sqn RAF

609 (West Riding) Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force: 609 Squadron came into being on the 10th February 1936 as part of the expanding Auxiliary Air Force. Initially a bomber squadron equipped with Hawker Harts. On 8th December, 1938, the Squadrons role was changed from bomber to fighter and the squadron took delivery of its first Spitfires Mk I during August 1939. The squadrons first victory was a Heinkel HE111 H-2 of 2/KG26 which was shot down near St. Abbs Head, 27th February 1940, by Flying Officer G. D. Ayre, Pilot Officer J R Buchanan and Flying Officer D Persse-Joynt. 609 squadron was, it is said, the first Spitfire Squadron to reach 100 victories (Ju88 A-5 1/KG51) on 21st October 1940. The victory was shared by Flight Lieutenant F J Howell and Pilot Officer S J Hill. During April 1942, 609 began to replace its Spitfires with Hawker Typhoons, and went on to become the first Typhoon squadron with 227 victories. Based at many RAF Stations 609 was in action throughout WWII, covering the Dunkirk evacuation, the Battle of Britain and supporting the D-Day landings as part of the 2nd TAF. There were many decorations awarded to squadron members, these included 3 DSOs, 22 DFCs and Bars and 4 DFMs. On 16th December 1947, King George VI gave permission for use of the Royal Prefix for all Auxiliary Air Force Squadrons. 609 Squadron Royal Auxiliary Air Force was disbanded on 10th March 1957, whilst equipped with Gloster Meteors F8 at RAF Church Fenton, Yorkshire. On 1st October, 1999, 609 (west Riding) Squadron, Royal Auxiliary Air Force, was re-formed at RAF Leeming operating in the guise of Air Defence Support Squadron (ADSS).
Signatures for : Typhoon
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Flight Lieutenant Ken Adam OBE
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Flight Lieutenant Ken Adam OBE

One of only two German nationals (the other was his brother) to fly operationally for the RAF, Klaus Hugo Adam was a German national, born in Berlin, who left Germany in 1934 to escape the Nazi persecution. He joined the RAF in August 1942 and after flying training, mostly in the USA, joined 609 Squadron flying Typhoons in October 1943. Known to everyone in the Squadron as Heinie, he served with the squadron until the end of the war, the hazards of operational flying increased for him by the knowledge that capture as a POW would certainly end in death. Demobilised in 1946 he went on to a very successful career as an art director in the film industry and is best known, perhaps, for his work on the Bond films. -- I think what affected me most and I will remember for the rest of my life, was the aftermath of the battle for the Falaise Gap. After it was all over, 609 Squadron were given a day off and we decided to drive into the Falaise area to get a first hand view from the ground of the results of our rocket attacks. Unfortunately our truck was trapped in an armoured column moving at a snails pace, since the road or what was left of it was choked with wreckage, swollen corpses of men of the SS divisions, dead cattle and horses. The stench of death was everywhere. We tried to breath through our handkerchiefs which we knotted over our mouths and noses, to little avail. The sickly sweet smell of death stuck to our uniforms and bodies for days to come. This was my first contact on the ground with the dead and what had been the enemy. Attacking a target from the air, one felt strangely removed from the realities and horror on the ground. This was our first decisive defeat of the German army, in which 609 Squadron and other rocket Typhoon squadrons of 84 Group played such a vital role, but my feelings of elation at this victory were muted by the carnage of dead bodies and even more so the grotesque spectacle of countless dead horses with their limbs rigidly sticking up in the air. It was an experience I will never forget.




Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson
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Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson

Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson flew with 16 Sqn from 1943 until the war was over. He trained in Georgia, USA, before becoming attached to 16 Sqn at Benson, flying missions over France and Germany. Bill flew many different types of aircraft beginning with a PT17 Stearman in the USA; others include Tiger Moths, Typhoons, Tempest, Harvards, Lysanders, Hurricanes and Oxfords.



Flight Lieutenant Sir John Atkinson KCB DFC
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Flight Lieutenant Sir John Atkinson KCB DFC

John Atkinson joined the RAF from Oxford University in 1938 and completed his pilot training in England. His first operational posting was in 1940 to 234 Squadron at St Eval, Cornwall, flying Spitfires, before moving on to 609 Squadron at Warwell, Dorchester. In 1942 he converted to Typhoons with 609 Squadron at Duxford, and from there to Biggin Hill and Manston, launching fighter operations over France. When his tour of operations ended in 1943 he was awarded the DFC and went on to become a Flying Instructor until the war was over. Released from the RAF in 1945, he went on to have a successful career in the civil service, and was knighted in 1979.



Squadron Leader Percival H. Beake DFC
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Squadron Leader Percival H. Beake DFC

Joining the RAFVR in April 1939, Percival Beake was mobilised at the outbreak of war. Posted to 64 Squadron on Spitfires in the summer of 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain, he flew with them until June 1941 when he was posted first to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill, and then 601 Squadron at Duxford. After a spell instructing he returned for his second tour in December 1942, joining 193 Squadron as a Flight Commander. In May 1944 he took command of 164 Squadron at Thorney Island flying Typhoons, moving to France shortly after the Normandy Invasion. With two victories to his credit he was awarded the DFC in September 1944.

Starting with 6th August 1944 my log book records that a successful attack was carried out on an enemy strong point in a quarry and that on the following morning I flew home on a very rare 48 hour leave. For a few days after my return we had only one specific target - an enemy dump which we effectively bombarded with rockets on 11th August - so we were deployed on armed reconnaissances. After landing from one of these on 13th August my Wing Commander, Walter Dring, called me to his caravan and said - Beaky, you have just done your last op. You are not to fly again and that is an order, until returning to the UK. I am arranging for your relief as soon as possible. - I was absolutely stunned and my lasting memory of that period is not of carnage but of acute embarrassment at having been grounded. I just hated sending the squadron up without myself leading and remember making frequent calls to the met office hoping to get forecasts of filthy weather that would make operational flying impossible. In the event, my relief, Squadron Leader Ian Waddy, was shot down by flak within two or three days of taking over command, so maybe Wally Dring had some sort of premonition that prompted my grounding.




Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL
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19 / 11 / 2001Died : 19 / 11 / 2001
Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL

One of World War IIs great characters, Bee flew Hurricanes with 87 Squadron, later leading a Tempest Wing. He had 8 victories plus a further 32 VIs destroyed. After the war he became a highly respected Chief Test Pilot.Wing Commander Roland Beamont, one of the RAFs top buzz bomb interceptors, was born in Enfield England on August 10, 1920. Educated at Eastborne College, Beamont accepted a short service commission with the Royal Air Force in 1938. He commenced flying in 1939 at the the No. 13 Reserve Flying School at White Waltham. His initial duty was with the Group Fighter Pool at St. Athan where he learned to fly the Hurricane. Beamont was soon posted with the No. 87 Squadron which was part of the Advanced Air Striking Force in France. Seeing action in both France and Belgium prior to the Allied withdrawl, Beamont rejoined 87 Squadron in England during the Battle of Britain. In the spring of 1941 Beamont was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross after destroying five enemy aircraft. As Commanding Officer of 609 Squadron, Beamont pioneered both day and night ground attack missions utilizing the Typhoon. Beamont was credited with destroying 25 trains in a three month period. He was then made responsible for organizing and commanding the first Tempest Wing at Newchurch. Three days after D-Day Bearnont shot down an Me-109, marking the first aerial combat victory for the Hawker Tempest. In the summer of 1944 Beamont destroyed 32 buzz bombs prior to leading his wing to a Dutch Airfield at Volkel on the Continent. In October of 1944 Beamont was shot down during a ground attack mission over Germany, and he remained a prisoner of war until wars end. Following repatriation Beamont became an experimental test pilot with the Gloster Aircraft Company, which had developed the RAFs first jet aircraft. Turning down a permanent commission with the RAF, Beamont then joined English Electric Company in Wharton as the Chief Test Pilot for the B3/45 (Canberra) jet bomber program. He managed all prototype testing on the Canberra, and in the process set two Atlantic speed records. Later Beamont was involved with the supersonic P1/Lightning program, and became the first British pilot to fly at twice the speed of sound. From 1965 until 1970 he was a founding member of Britains highly succesful Saudi Arabian export program. For several years prior to his retirement in 1979, Beamont was Director of Operations for British Aerospace and Panavia where he was in charge of flight testing for the Tornado. Since his retirement Beamont has authored nine books, and published numerous magazine articles. He is a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Scociety and an Honorary Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots in America. He died 19th November 2001.



Bee Beamont in the cockpit.




Air Chief Marshal Sir Harry Broadhurst GCB, KBE, DSO, DFC
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29 / 8 / 1995Died : 29 / 8 / 1995
Air Chief Marshal Sir Harry Broadhurst GCB, KBE, DSO, DFC

Harry Broadhurst had already made his mark in the RAF by the time war broke out, having been mentioned in dispatches whilst operating over the North West Frontier in India. The outbreak of WWII brought a rapid promotion to Wing Commander, which did not prevent him from flying on operations at every opportunity, playing a very active role in the Battle of Britain. In December 1940 he became commanding officer of Hornchurch, and flew often on the early sweeps in summer 1941. He remained in charge of Hornchurch until May 1942, but flew again in August 1942 over Dieppe, where he claimed four victories. Broadhurst served in the Western Desert from 1942-43 first as Senior Air Staff Officer, the Air Officer Commanding. Recalled to England to participate in preparations for the invasion of Europe, Broadhurst was put in command of 83 Group of the 2nd Tactical Air Force. In Normandy, and during the months that followed, his involvement with Typhoons reached its peak, including the astounding victory over the German 7th Army in the Falaise Gap. His leadership during the aerial assault on German ground forces in Normandy proved decisive in asserting Allied air supremacy at a critical period of the war. Harry Broadhurst, who became the youngest Air Vice-Marshal in the RAF, was later knighted, and rose to the rank of Air Chief Marshal. He continued his RAF career long after the end of the war, eventually becoming Commander Allied Air Forces, Central Europe. He died 29th August 1995.



Flying Officer John Byrne
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Flying Officer John Byrne

With the RAF since 1938, Byrne flew Hurricanes, Spitfires, P-47s, Tempests and Typhoons during WWII. Upon joining 197 Sqn in March 1944 he flew Typhoons during one the squadrons most hectic periods in the run up to D-Day and throughout the subsequent Allied invasion, mostly on low-level bombing missions. In total Byrne completed over 150 combat operations and finally left the RAF in 1946.




Flight Lieutenant Roy Crane
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Flight Lieutenant Roy Crane

Joining the RAF Volunteer Reserve in 1940, Roy Crane was the deferred for nine months before call-up and flying training in the UK and Canada, receiving his Wings and Commission in December 1942. After operational training on Hurricanes, he joined 182 Typhoon Squadron in August 1943. Sorties included dive bombing and fighter escort duties. Transferred to 181 Squadron in April 1944 where worties with cannon and rockets included V1 and V2 sites as well as gun positions, petrol dumps, trains and marshalling yards, etc, in preparation for the invasion. In May this intensified with attacks on heavily defended radar sites along the French coast and shipping strikes. With the invasion a success, 181 Squadron was in the forefront of the Typhoons squadrons attacks on the German ground forces in Normandy, operating from forward airfields in France. On 2nd August 1944 his aircraft was hit by flak at low level and he became a POW. He had completed 71 operational sorties -- Whilst attacking tanks and motorised transport with rockets and cannon in the area of Falaise on 2nd August 1944, my aircraft was twice hit by 40mm flak at low level. I baled out and landed in a very hostile Waffen SS camp, lucky to be quickly rescued by two of the nearby German Air Force gun crew that had shot me down. Later that evening I was taken in an open German staff car by the Oberfeldwebel from the gun crew, a driver and an armed motorcycle escort in the direction of Falaise. We had only travelled a short distance, when about to pass a column of German tanks, they were attacked by six Typhoons firing rockets and cannon. They came round again and again, leaving terrible carnage. This was an ordeal that has to be experienced to be truly appreciated. They finally got me out of the Falaise pocket to Alencon, after which I was eventually taken after intensive interrogation at Oberursal, to Stalag Luft III at Sagan.




Air Marshal Sir Denis Crowley-Milling KCB, CBE, DSO, DFC, AE
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1996Died : 1996
1996Ace : 8.00 Victories
Air Marshal Sir Denis Crowley-Milling KCB, CBE, DSO, DFC, AE

He joined the RAFVR in 1937 as a Sgt, joining 615 squadron in France. During the Battle of Britain he was posted to 242 squadron and after winning a DFC joined 610 squadron as a Flight Commander in 1942. But, on 21st August he was shot down over France, evading capture and with the help of the resistance reached Spain, where he was interned for three months. After reaching England he rejoined 610 squadron and in 1942 was awarded his second DFC for operation on Typhoons. In 1943 he went to the USAAF Headquarters in England co-ordinating fighter operations with US heavy bomber raids. After the war he stayed in the R.A.F. and had a very successful career, rising to the rank Air Marshal. He died in late 1996.

Dennis Crowley-Milling signing the print - Fighting Lady - by Graeme Lothian



Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM
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Flight Lieutenant Roy Daines DFM

Roy Daines joined the RAF as soon as he was able, and after completing his hurried training as a pilot, was posted to join 247 Squadron in the autumn of 1940. Here he flew Gladiators and Hurricanes on coastal patrols, 247 being the only squadron to fly Gladiators during the Battle of Britain, before converting to nightfighting Hurricanes. Later, in 1943, he flew Typhoons with 247 before being posted to join 65 Squadron flying Spitfires and Mustangs.

Roy Daines signing the print Victory Above Dover

Roy Daines signing the original pencil drawing A Dunkirk Encounter




Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*
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28 / 8 / 2011Died : 28 / 8 / 2011
28 / 8 / 2011Ace : 24.50 Victories
Group Captain Billy Drake DSO DFC*

Joined the R.A.F. in 1936. His first posting was to 1 squadron flying Furies then Hurricanes and first saw action over France in the Spring of 1940 and was awarded his first DFC by the end of the year. As a Squadron Leader he was sent to West Africa to command 128 Squadron. 1942 saw his commanding 112 squadron in North Africa, in July saw an immediate BAR to his DFC and in December an immediate DSO. Posted to Malta as Wing Commander he won a US DFC in 1943. Back in the UK he now was flying Typhoons in the lead up to D-Day. With Pete Brothers he was sent to the States to attend the US Staff School at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he continued in the R.A.F. serving in Japan, Malaya, Singapore, Switzerland and his final posting as Group Captain RAF Chivenor, Devon. Retired in July 1963. Going to Portugal where he ran a Bar and Restaurant and dealing in Real Estate. In his flying career he accounted for more than 24 enemy aircraft. Sadly, Billy Drake passed away on 28th August 2011.

Billy Drake signing the print - Fighting Lady - by Graeme Lothian.




Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO DFC DI
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10 / 7 / 1995Died : 10 / 7 / 1995
10 / 7 / 1995Ace : 11.00 Victories
Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO DFC DI

Hugh Dundas was born on the 2nd of July 1920 in Doncaster. Hugh Dundas, like his elder brother John, became fascinated by the idea of flying from childhood, and straight after leaving Stowe School in 1938 joined the Auxiliary Air Force. As a pre-war member of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, Hugh Dundas was called up early in the war, serving with 616 Squadron. After a promising start as a fighter pilot, Dundas was shot down on 22nd August and wounded during the Battle of Britian, but returned to his squadron in September 1940. His brother John, a 12 victory ace with No.609 Squadron, was killed in action in November 1940 after shooting down the top–scoring German Luftwaffe ace at the time, Helmut Wick. In early 1941 he was at Tangmere and came under the command of Wing Commander Douglas Bader. Dundas became one of the leading members of that Wing and frequently flew with Bader, gradually building his reputation as a fighter pilot and tactician. After receiving the DFC, Dundas became Flight Commander in 610 Squadron. December 1941 brought another promotion as commanding officer of 56 Squadron, the first in the RAF to be converted to Typhoons. Posted to the Mediterranean in 1943, he led 244 Spitfire Wing from Malta and later Italy. In 1944, Dundas was awarded the DSO and became one of the youngest Group Captains in the RAF. For some years after the war, Dundas served once more with the RAuxAF during which time he became CO of 601 Squadron. His war time score was 4 destroyed, 6 shared destroyed, 2 shared probables, and 2 and 1 shared damaged. After the war had ended Dundas served with the RAuxAF as CO of No.601 Squadron and was the air correspondent for the Daily Express newspaper. In 1961 he joined Rediffusion ltd becoming a Director in 1966, and Chairman of Thames Television unitl 1987, when he was knighted. In 1989 he served as High Sheriff of Surrey. Sir Hugh Dundas died on 10th July 1995 at the age of 74.



Squadron Leader Rik A C Dupre
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Squadron Leader Rik A C Dupre

Rik Dupre joined the RAF in 1940 and on completing his pilot training in Canada returned to England to join 609 Typhoon Squadron at Manston. After D-Day the squadron moved to France and continued to serve in occupied Europe, providing close support for the Army. He stayed with 609 for the duration of the war, and in 1945 took a permanent commission serving mainly in the Far East. He retired from the RAF in 1967.



Wing Commander Jerry Eaton DFC
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Wing Commander Jerry Eaton DFC

Jerry Eaton learnt to fly in Oklahoma USA. Jerry Eaton Flew with 257 Sqn as part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force ( based at Warmwell in Dorset during 1943 ) and converted to Typhoon 1Bs in 1943 on escorts supporting troops as part of the Allied advances. Jerry Eaton was based at Tangmere, Lymington, Hurn, Normandy and the Low Countries. He remained in service with the RAF until 1972 and left the RAF as a Wing Commander.



Air Commodore J W Frost CBE, DFC, DL
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7 / 8 / 2010Died : 7 / 8 / 2010
Air Commodore J W Frost CBE, DFC, DL

Jack Frost commenced flying training in July 1941, completing his training in the USA. After a short period as a flying instructor he returned to the UK for operational training on Hurricanes. In February 1944 Jack Frost joined No 175 Squadron which was converting to the rocket-firing role. In April the squadron moved to the New Forest and started operations over northern France. Leading up to D-Day, Jack Frost flew 12 sorties, attacking vital radar stations that had to be put out of action before the invasion. On June 6 he flew an armed-reconnaissance sortie to attack enemy transports taking reinforcements to the beachhead. 175 Squadron equipped with Typhoons in January 1944. On August 7th 1944 a major German counter-attack, spearheaded by five Panzer divisions, was identified moving against just two US infantry divisions. The Panzers were threatening to cut off the US Third Army near the town of Mortain. More than 300 sorties were flown by the squadrons on the Day of the Typhoon. Frost claimed a Tiger tank and a troop carrier, as well as two unidentified targets as flamers. Frosts Typhoon was hit by 20mm flak but he managed to return to his airstrip. The intense effort of the Typhoon squadrons defeated the German counter-attack, which the Chief of Staff of the Seventh German Army reported had come to a standstill due to employment of fighter-bombers by the enemy and the absence of our own air support. Frost and his fellow Typhoon pilots were made available immediately to be called down over the radio by ground controllers as the Allied armies encircled the German Forces at Falaise and the break out from Normandy that followed. Jack Frost carried out many attacks against gun positions, tank and transport concentrations, all in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire. The Typhoon squadrons suffered heavy casualties. He completed an operational tour of 100 sorties in December 1944 and after the war went on to a distinguished career with the peacetime RAF. Flying Typhoons and the Tempest, based in Schleswig-Holstein then moving to Kastrup in Denmark. Jack frost would later command No 26 Squadron at Gutersloh in Germany. In 1948 he was appointed RAF Liaison Officer to HQ BETFOR, responsible for air advice and control of air support for the British Army Brigade, based in Trieste. During this sensitive period, Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia was causing some difficulties and Frost led a four-aircraft dummy attack on his headquarters as a reminder of the RAFs continued, and potent, presence in the area. In May 1949 he returned to Britain to command No 222 (Natal) Squadron, equipped with Meteor day fighters, as air defences were rebuilt with the emergence of the Soviet threat. Frost served in Malaya at the Air Headquarters during the communist insurrection, when he was involved with planning the development of airfields and air defence radar. After service in Hong Kong he returned to flying duties when he took command of No 151 Squadron, flying the delta-wing Javelin night fighter from Leuchars in Scotland. After a series of senior appointments in the MOD, Jack Frost was posted in August 1970 to the Joint Warfare Establishment. After a four-year appointment as Deputy and Chief of Staff to the UK Military Representative to Nato Headquarters in Brussels, he retired from the RAF in October 1976. Sadly Jack Frost passed away on August 7th 2010.



Air Vice-Marshal Denys Gillam
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1991Died : 1991
1991Ace : 7.00 Victories
Air Vice-Marshal Denys Gillam

Battle of Britain Ace who served with 616 and 312 Squadrons. He scored a total of 7 victories, including one of the fastest ever, where he downed a Ju-88 which was making a bombing run, as he took off from the airfield. He took command of the Typhoon Wing at Duxford in March 1942, which flew their first combat operation in June 1942. He died in 1991.




Flight Lieutenant John Golley
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Flight Lieutenant John Golley

John Golley flew Hurricanes, Spitfires and Typhoons during World War II, commencing his combat flying with fighter sweeps and ground attacks over Northern Europe. During the run up to D-Day his No. 245 Squadron Typhoons were equipped with rockets, specializing in tank-busting in the Normandy Campaign. He has written several best-selling military books including The Day of the Typhoon.




Flight Lieutenant Ron Grant
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Flight Lieutenant Ron Grant

Ron was serving with the Auxilliary Air Force when war broke out. After operational training he joined 183 Squadron flying Typhoons. In March 1944 his Typhoon was converted to rockets for attacking ships, barges, rocket and radar sites in preparation for the Invasion. In July 1944 he transferred to 609 Squadron in Normandy. In August 1944 Ron was forced to bail out after engine failure and became a POW.



Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
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Flight Lieutenant Bill Green

In December 1936, Bill Green joined the Auxiliary Air Force as an aero engine fitter with 501 Squadron at Filton, near Bristol. Shortly before the start of the Second World War, he was given a rare chance for an engine fitter. In 1938 he joined a scheme to recruit NCO pilots, qualifying as a Flight Sergeant and re-joined 501 at Bristol in July 1940. Sgt Bill Green had completed just 10 hours of dual flying – with an instructor. In October, he was sent for further flying instruction and on October 30th he had his first solo flight in a Magister aircraft. After more training – and getting married on June 3rd – he flew a Hurricane for the first time on August 8th 1940, when the Battle of Britain had been raging for a month. He flew from Kenley throughout the Battle of Britain until November, surviving being shot down twice, before being posted to 504 Squadron. After a spell instructing on Spitfires and Tomahawks, he converted to Typhoons, and from November 1944 served with 56 Squadron on Tempests. He flew more than 50 missions in Tempest fighter aircraft with 56 Squadron. He was shot down over Germany on February 22nd 1945 and spent the last three months of the war as a prisoner of war. After the war, Green enjoyed a hugely successful business career, ending up as the managing director and chairman of Crown Paints, before retiring on his 60th birthday.



F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC
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F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC

F/O Tony (Titch) Hallett DFC a member of 198 Rocket Firing Typhoon Squadron operated from bases in Southern England (Manston to Hurn). Operating from Thorney Island on D-Day and then from several landing strips on The Beachhead, France and Belgium between January and November 1944. After Fighter Pilot training in the USA in 1941/42 he returned to the UK for conversion to Hurricanes and was then posted to an Army Co-operation Unit in Northern Ireland where he gained valuable experience flying various types of aircraft, i.e. Defiant, Lysander, Hurricane, Martinet and Twin Engine Oxford. His operational flying from Southern England consisted mainly of attacking the many strongly defended Radar Stations from Ostend to Cherbourg and on two occasions changed from rockets to bombs for attacks on Noball Targets (flying bomb sites). Operations from the landing strips consisted, with close Army Support, taking out Gun Positions, attacking Tanks and destroying anything that moved in enemy territory all against very heavy enemy Flak. He completed in excess of 100 sorties and since 1984 has revisited Normandy on many occasions. He attended the official funerals of two 198 Squadron Pilots whose aircraft wreckage had been discovered as many as 41 and 49 years after the events.



Warrant Officer Jack Hodges DFC
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Warrant Officer Jack Hodges DFC

Jack Hodges joined the RAF in late 1940, and after completing his pilot training in Canada he returned to England and was then briefly sent to a Photo Reconnaissance Unit flying Spitfires. He moved to a OTU in Annan, Scotland on Hurricanes before finally moving to a holding unit in Redhill, flying Typhoons. In 1944 he was posted to join 175 Squadron. Shortly after this he moved to 174 Squadron at Westhampnett. He served on operations throughout occupied Europe until the end of the war, being awarded the DFC in 1945 for successfully leading a group of Typhoons against a German Armoured Division.



Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC
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Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC

Flt. Lt. David Ince DFC was born in Glasgow and was educated at Aysgarth School and Cheltenham College. Failing to meet the eyesight standards for aircrew he became a gunner officer in 1940 and managed to pass a wartime RAF medical board at his third attempt. Seconded for Army Cooperation duties, he trained in Canada at 35 EFTS and 37 SFTS before returning to the UK to fly Hurricanes and Mustangs at 41 OTU. Subsequently converting to Typhoons he flew with 193 and 257 Squadrons, from Normandy until the end of hostilities in Europe, completing almost 150 sorties and being awarded an immediate DFC. He took a leading part in trials, demonstrations and the early operational use of Napalm. Almost shot down on one reconnaissance flight, he later devised and proved a camera installation for low level close up target photography, which was an immediate success. In the closing stages of the war he was leading 193 Squadron on shipping strikes in the Baltic. After attending the first post war course at The Empire Test Pilots School he returned to University to complete an engineering degree.



Group Captain Alec Ingle
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31 / 7 / 1999Died : 31 / 7 / 1999
Group Captain Alec Ingle

Alec Ingle was commissioned in June 1940 and joined 615 Squadron at Drem flying Hurricanes before moving to Croydon during the Battle of Britain. He probably destroyed a Do17 in September; in October he shot down an Me109 and probably two more, and yet another victory in November, at which time he was appointed B Flight Commander. He later commanded 609 Squadron at Manston before leading 124 Wing in 1943 flying Typhoons. He was shot down in September 1943 after his Typhoon blew up in combat with an Fw190. Badly burned, he spent the remainder of the war as a POW in Stalag Luft III. Alec Ingle was awarded the AFC and DFC. Sadly Alec Ingle died on 31st July 1999.




Wing Commander M R Ingle-Finch DFC, AFC
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2002Died : 2002
Wing Commander M R Ingle-Finch DFC, AFC

Michael Ingle-Finch commenced his operational RAF career flying Hurricanes during and after the Battle of Britain. He then joined 56 Squadron based at Duxford and was amongst the first squadron pilots to fly a Typhoon when the first operational Typhoons came into service on that significant day, 11th September 1941. In September 1942, by now promoted to Flight Commander, Ingle-Finch achieved another first - 56 Squadrons first air victory in a Typhoon when he shot down a Junkers Ju88 off the east coast. Having been involved with Typhoons since they became operational, Ingle-Finch went on to fly them throughout their operational life. On 31st December 1943, he was promoted to command 175 Squadron during the decisive campaign in Normandy. In that same year he was awarded the DFC. His distinguished wartime service in the RAF culminated in promotion to Wing Commander Flying of 124 Wing. Passed away 2002.



Squadron Leader Robert Kings
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Squadron Leader Robert Kings

Robert Kings flew Hurricanes in the Battle of Britain with 238 Squadron at St Eval, where he was twice forced to bale out, the second time being hospitalised after a heavy landing due to a damaged parachute. Rejoining the squadron, in 1941 they embarked for North Affica, attached to 274 Squadron in the Western Desert. In November 1941 his Hurricane was shot down over the desert, where he was spotted and rescued by soldiers from the 22nd Armoured Division en-route to Tobruk, and was able to rejoin his squadron. Bob Kings was also a test pilot on Typhoons.



Flying Officer Kenneth Junior Kneen
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Flying Officer Kenneth Junior Kneen

Training overseas, on arriving back in the UK Ken was posted to Holland joining 175 Squadron flying Typhoons. The squadron at the time being heavily engaged in low level bombing strikes against rail and armoured targets along the Dutch German border region. He remained with the squadron until the end of the war, then joined the RAFVR.




Flight Lieutenant James Kyle DFM
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Flight Lieutenant James Kyle DFM

James Kyle joined the RAF in 1941 and trained as a pilot in Dallas, Texas, before returning home to become a member of 197 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Drem upon its formation. In March 1943 the Squadron moved to Tangmere, and he became one of a precious few survivors of a full tour of operations, being awarded the DFM in 1944. He was demobilised in 1947 as a flight commander with 80 Tempest Fighter Squadron in Germany. He spent some years away from the service but the urge to fly never left and he rejoined the RAF in 1951 and became a Qualified Flying Instructor. He retired in 1974 after 30 years service.




Flight Lieutenant Sir Archie Lamb KBE CMG DFC
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Flight Lieutenant Sir Archie Lamb KBE CMG DFC

Archie Lamb joined the RAF from the Foreign Office after the outbreak of war. Returning from training in Southern Rhodesia, his troopship Orinsay was torpedoed, and he spent nine days in a lifeboat. Joining 184 Squadron, flying Hurricane rocket-firing fighter-bombers, the squadron converted to Typhoons early in 1944. Flying from Westhampnett, he flew two missions on D-Day. He transferred to 245 Squadron in mid 1944 as a Flight Commander. After the war he returned to the Foreign Office, becoming H.M. Ambassador to Kuwait, and to Norway.




Squadron Leader Arthur Leigh DFC, DFM
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Squadron Leader Arthur Leigh DFC, DFM

Another RAFVR pilot, The son of a regular soldier, Arthur Leigh was called up at the outbreak of war. After finishing his flying training he was posted to 7 OTU and then on to convert to Spitfires in August 1940. Arthur Leigh flew with 64 Squadron at Leconfield and 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill during the Battle of Britain before transferring to 611 Squadron. Awarded the DFM in September 1941, Leigh had then completed 50 sweeps, had destroyed two Bf 109s, probably destroyed another four and shared in the destruction of a Do 17. After a spell instructing and ferrying Hurricanes from Gibraltar to Cairo, he returned to operations with 56 Squadron flying Typhoons from Manston. He was shot down on his first sweep by flak, near Calais but was picked up by an ASR launch. In late 1943 Leigh was posted to 129 Squadron at Hornchurch and was awarded the DDC on completing his second tour in December 1944, spending the rest of the war as an instructor.




Air Commodore C D Kit North Lewis DSO DFC
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25 / 3 / 2008Died : 25 / 3 / 2008
Air Commodore C D Kit North Lewis DSO DFC

After joining the Army in 1939, Kit North Lewis transferred to the RAF in 1940. In Aug 1941, after pilot training, he was posted to 13 Squadron, flying Blenheims, where he took part in the first 1000 bomber raids. After a spell with 26 Squadron, flying P-51 Mustangs, in Feb 1944 he joined 182 Squadron on Typhoons, as a Flight Commander. A few months later he was posted to command 181 Squadron. He led this squadron into France where it became part of 124 Typhoon Wing. In Aug 1944 he was promoted Wing Leader 124 Wing, where he remained until the end of the war. He died on 25th March 2008. 'Unfortunately my active participation in the Falaise operations was limited as I had a mild form of dysentery from 8th to 14th and I was sent home for a weeks recuperation from 16th to 24th August. However, I was very much involved on the 7th in the German attack at Mortain. I was leading 181 Squadron on an armed reconnaissance when Charles Green who was then the Wing Leader of 121 Wing reported large German tank concentrations at Mortain. Although this was inside the bomb line I accepted his verification and I immediately diverted to Mortain. There we found German tanks strung out along the road. We claimed 10 flamers. I followed this up with two more sorties in which we claimed another 7. There was very little flak, the main danger being the number of allied aircraft around the honey pot. During the period 6th to 21st August the Wing lost 9 pilots killed including Group Captain Charles Appleton and 4 taken POW.'



Warrant Officer John Abe Lincoln
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Warrant Officer John Abe Lincoln

Born in 1923, Abe Lincoln joined the RAF in August 1942, spending two years training in India and Rhodesia. After training he was posted back to the UK, flying first Spitfires and then on Typhoons with 175 Squadron. The squadron was by then heavily involved with softening up targets with rockets ahead of the armies advance and close support duties at the front as the allies advanced through France into Germany. He remained with the squadron until the end of the war.



Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC
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25 / 3 / 2008Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC

Born in September 1922, James Doug Lindsay joined the RCAF in February 1941, training on Harvards. He was posted to the UK, arriving in March 1943 and joining 403 Sqn in October that year. In his first tour, he claimed 5 Me109s as well as 2 Fw190s, plus another damaged. Of the Me109s he shot down, three of these were in a single minute, earning him a DFC. For his second tour, he rejoined 403 Sqn in April 1945, claiming a probable Fw190 during his short time with this squadron before he moved to 416 squadron until the end of the war in Europe. After the war he stayed with the air force, and in 1952 served during the Korean war with the USAF. He flew F-86 Sabres with the 39th Fighter Squadron of the 51st Fighter Wing, claiming victories over two MiG-15s and damaging 3 others. In 1953, he returned to the UK with No.1 Fighter Wing leading Sabres in formation at the Queen's Coronation. He retired in 1972, having flown more than 30 different types of aircraft (excluding different Mks). These included, Harvard, Anson, Master, Spitfire, Typhoon, Tempest, Hurricane, Mustang, Beaufort, Beaufighter, Oxford, Dakota, Tiger Moth, Vampire and Sabre.




Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell
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Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell

Volunteered for the RAFVR in January 1941. He trained in Canada on Tiger Moths and Oxfords. He received his wings in April 1942 and was posted to Central Flying School. Following graduation, he taught Fleet Air Arm trainees on Harvards. He returned to the UK in March 1943 and flew Masters at AFU and Hurricanes at OTU. He taught Lancaster crews fighter evasion prior to posting to 84 GSU to fly Typhoons. He joined 197 Squadron at Needs Oar Point in the New Forest in June 1944 and was involved in close support operations and tactical dive bombing and low level bombing throughout the Normandy campaign and on through to VE-Day. He completed 135 operations and in August 1945 was posted to an OTU to instruct on Typhoons and Tempest Vs. He was demobbed in June 1946 and flew weekends in the VR on Tiger Moths and later Chipmunks. He was called up on the G Reserve in July 1951 and flew Harvards, Spitfire XXIIs and then Vampire Vs. He stood down in September as the Korea situation eased.



W/O Bill Macia
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W/O Bill Macia

3 Tempest Sqn but also flew Typhoons.



Flight Lieutenant Ramsay Milne
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Flight Lieutenant Ramsay Milne

One of many Canadians who served with the Typhoon squadrons of the 2nd TAF, Ramsay Milne grew up on a farm on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, joining up in October 1940. After flying training he was posted in December 1942 to 245 Squadron on Typhoons. While engaged in a patrol to counter German hit and run radiers in May 1943, an engine failure landed him in the North Sea from which he was rescued by an RAF Walrus. In February 1944 he was posted to 440 Squadron - a Canadian unit - with which he served throughout the invasion of Normandy campaign until he was shot down and made a POW 0n 19th August 1944. -- Our ops area was south of Lisieux on the 18th August and once there it was every man for himself. Scenes are still vivid in my mind - a number of Krauts piling off a motorbike and sidecar all trying to get through a door at the same time - a lorry speeding down the road between trees, a short burst, it rolls sideways into the field. Then - motorbike speeding down the road. Ammunition was always a problem, not enough - put the bead at the point where his backside meets the saddle - just fan the gun button, it worked, one round from each gun, a bullseye. He seemed to slowly rise holding the handlebars - I was up and away - no shortage of targets. Devastation, a mild word to describe the area, and the smell of decaying Kraut was evident at 2-3000 feet. Not pleasant. Some lasted longer than others, and others not at all. My time came on August 19th around noon. Luckily I was not shot, as I had a Hun revolver, figuring I would be able to shoot my way to freedom, gangster style. My mind changed quickly when surrounded by six or seven Hun plus a Black Shirted little devil. His hostility grew when he examined the Automatic and I figured my time was up. Fortunately the gun, a Colt type, was stamped made in Belgium and I told him in Kraut English that I had bought it in Chicago. There was doubt on his face but eventually the tension eased. The next morning on the march we were shot at by a sister squadron, and to top it the leader was a French Canadian - I have checked the records.



Squadron Leader Geoff Murphy
Click the name above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Geoff Murphy
Squadron Leader Geoff Murphy

Geoff Murphy started flying with Aberdeen University Squadron as a 17 year old student in April 1941. He was called up in October and completed his flying training in Florida in August 1942. After staff piloting duties at a radio school, he was posted to fly Hurricanes in mid 1943 flying convoy patrols over the North Sea. Early in 1944 he converted to Typhoons and joined 245 Squadron in mid May 1944, just in time for D-Day. He had only fired four practice concrete head rockets before going on his first op. He stayed with 245 Squadron for the remainder of the war. He became a Flight Commander and was Mentioned in Despatches. At the end of hostilities in Europe, he had completed 141 operational sorties. After the war he stayed on in the Air Force, his duties including command of the first Jet Provost Squadron in the RAF. -- The slaughter in the Pocket continued up yo about 25th August with the lanes in the bocage country bordered by high banks being death traps to tanks, vehicles, men and horses which tried to move along them. The destruction and casualties were appalling and even from the air the stench of death was apparent from inside closed cockpits. As the noose tightened, it became clear that the one type of equipment which the Germans did not abandon in their headlong flight was their flak, as was evident from the casualties sustained. The ground attack pilots and the German flak gunners were constant daily adversaries throghout the campaign, since on every operation, in order to hit their targets, pilots had to dive into a cone of concentrated flak, remaining within it until their weapons were aimed and released and perhaps being most vulnerable when pulling out. We had armour plate at our backs underneath the cockpit, but the engine and flying control systems were unprotected and in a steep climb away from the target, as speed was rapidly reducing, it was advisable to turn the aircraft rapidly from side to side to spoil the gunners aim. Alternatively, keeping the aircraft very low and using the maximum speed attained at the bottom of the dive to get away from the target at roof-top height, made it very difficult for the gunners to keep their sights on the aircraft. This technique led, however, to the risk that when a climb to height to join up with the rest of the Squadron was eventually commenced, airspeed was lower and the rate of climb poorer, so that any other flak batteries within range in the area had a greater chance of hitting you.




Warrant Officer Douglas Oram
Click the name above to see prints signed by Warrant Officer Douglas Oram
Warrant Officer Douglas Oram

Doug Oram joined the RAF in 1942 and went out to America to train as a pilot. In 1944 he joined 174 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Westhampnett, and spent a year on operations serving throughout occupied Europe. In 1945 he became a Flying Instructor and left the RAF in 1946. However he rejoined in 1947 and stayed in the service until retirement in 1967.




Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry
Click the name above to see prints signed by Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry
Sqn Ldr Hugh Parry

Hugh Parry joined the RAF from Northern Rhodesia in December 1939, and after training in England was posted in February 1941 to join 260 Squadron flying Hurricanes. In April he transferred to 266 Squadron flying first Spitfires and then Typhoons. In March 1943 he went to Malta with 601 Squadron on the USS Wasp, flying the Spitfire Vc, where he remained until July. After a spell as a test pilot, he returned to combat with 41 Squadron flying Spitfire MkXIIs. On 24th September 1943 he was shot down near Beauvais and managed to evade capture for the next five months until he was eventually captured by the Gestapo in Paris. After a month in prison he was sent to Stalag Luft III until the end of the war.



Air Commodore W Bill Pitt-Brown DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Air Commodore W Bill Pitt-Brown DFC
Air Commodore W Bill Pitt-Brown DFC

After Cranwell Bill Pitt-Brown was posted to India where he saw service on the North-West Frontier with 31 Squadron flying Wapatis and Valencias. When the Japanese attacked in the far east he was posted to command 5 Squadron flying H75A Mohawk fighters in Assam and on the Imphal and Arakan fronts. Returning to the UK he was given command of 174 Squadron with Typhoons which he led through the Normandy Invasion. In August 1944 he became Wing Leader of 121 Wing. He was rested in October 1944 after a total of more than 100 operational sorties. He went on to high command of the RAF after the war.

Memories of Normandy are coloured by the enemy speed of reaction to our air supremacy. In the first few days after D-Day the enemy rushed forward to confront the Allies. We created havoc by picking off targets to jam the traffic and then methodically flaming the lot. Very large losses of German tanks and MT were inflicted in the fluid situation. Then suddenly by day nothing in the area was immediately visible. The German guns and tanks had dug in hull-down in the deep bocage country hedges which were perfect for camouflage. MT moved cautiously in shade and shadow. The vicious close-quarter tank and infantry fighting was largely unseen. Air attacks on map references were acknowledged by the Army to be effective but were frustrating since results were seldom seen except for transport brew ups. The picture was transformed when the Allies burst out of the bridgehead primarily through sheer force of numbers. the whole area east of Avranches - Vire, Mortain, Flers, Falaise, Argentan erputed and became a seething mass of enemy trying to retreat. The air forces smashed, burnt and killed. It seemed unbelievable that so much enemy force could have been concealed; now that they were all in the open, the slaughter, explosions, and fires burning from endless daily air attack obliterated everything. It was deadful; dead horse-drawn transport, bloated farm animals and humans all contributed to the sickly sweet smell of death. The enemy escaped annihilation by being highly disciplined even after such a defeat. Their losses were appalling but their retreat was never a rout.




Wing Commander Jack Rose CMG MBE DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Jack Rose CMG MBE DFC

10 / 10 / 2009Died : 10 / 10 / 2009
Wing Commander Jack Rose CMG MBE DFC

Jack Rose was born on January 18 1917 at Blackheath, London, and was educated at Shooters Hill School before studying Science at University College London where he represented the university at rugby. He joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in October 1938, completing his training as a fighter pilot just before the outbreak of war. With the British Expeditionary force under constant air attack, fighter reinforcements were requested and Jack Rose flew one of the Hurricanes sent to Merville to reinforce No.3 Squadron. He was in action immediately and on the 15th he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf109 as the air battle reached its climax. For the next few days the Hurricane squadrons operated at maximum intensity. During the afternoon of the 18th Rose intercepted a lone Messerschmitt Bf110 fighter over Douai and shot it down. A few hours earlier, his elder brother Tommy, of No 56 Squadron, had been shot down and killed in his Hurricane. The following day Rose attacked a Heinkel 111 and closed to within a few yards to shoot the bombers port engine. Oil from the engine covered the windscreen of his Hurricane so he climbed away, slowed the aircraft down to almost stalling speed, loosened his harness, stood on his seat and leant out of the cockpit in an attempt to clean the windscreen. As he did, tracer from an enemy fighter hit his aircraft. Seeing Rose standing in the cockpit, the German pilot claimed he had shot down the Hurricane, but Rose managed to break away. His aircraft was badly damaged but he managed a forced landing at a forward airfield where the aircraft was destroyed. Orders were given to evacuate the Hurricanes on the 20th. Without an aircraft, Rose joined others on a French transport and was flown to England. In the 10 days of the air war, No 3 Squadron lost seven pilots killed with another taken prisoner. A further nine Hurricanes were lost. He formed the new 184 Squadron in 1942, initially on Hurricanes, later Spitfires. In late 1943 the squadron converted to rocket firing Typhoons, and were heavily involved in the build up to D-Day, moving to France in late 1944. He later transferred to the Far East, finishing the war with 3 victories. Leading the rocket-firing Hawker Typhoons of 184 Squadron, Jack Rose swept down on German armour concentrations south of Caen on D-Day, the first of many such sorties over Normandy Constantly on call during the battle, the squadrons targets ranged from enemy armour and convoys, to gun and mortar positions, bridges and railway targets. From June 14, they operated from Advanced Landing Grounds in France, with the enemy close enough to fire at them on landing and take-off. Rose joined his first squadron, No 32, at Biggin Hill flying Hurricanes. In the Battle for France he scored three victories before returning to England to take part in the Battle of Britain. In 1942 he formed 184 Squadron from scratch, leading it until October 1944. He later flew Hurricanes again in the Far East. He left the RAF in October 1945. Sadly, Jack Rose died on 10th October 2009.



Warrant Officer Norman Samuels
Click the name above to see prints signed by Warrant Officer Norman Samuels
Warrant Officer Norman Samuels

Initially flying Typhoons with 193 Sqn, Norman then transferred to 610 Sqn flying Spitfires on fighter sweeps over France, heavy-bomber missions, and operations against VIs. Returning to ground attack Typhoons over Europe with 193 Sqn, he was shot down in March 1945 and taken prisoner of war.




Ken Scott
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Ken Scott

Typhoon Pilot



Flight Lieutenant George Sheppard
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant George Sheppard
Flight Lieutenant George Sheppard

Volunteering initially in October 1940 and called up in January 1941, George Sheppard learnt to fly in America and graduated and was commissioned in April 1942. He stayed on as an instructor in America returning to England in March 1943. He joined 198 Typhoon Squadron and after the invasion moved to Normandy in July 1944. He stayed with the squadron all the way through to Germany, becoming a flight commander in February 1945. He flew a total of 84 operational sorties. He felw Meteors with 74 Squadron and Spitfires with 263 Squadron in Italy before demob in May 1946. -- At the time of the Falaise battle we were operating from B7 Martragny and checking my log book I flew 16 ops during this time. The targets in and around Falaise were troop concentrations, tanks, trucks, armoured vehicles and gun positions. A flight which I was in, claimed many tanks, trucks etc, these being the ones that could be identified. One did not hang around after firing rockets and cannons to check results of attacks as the flak was intensive. In our flight we lost 2 pilots killed, 2 baled out but returned to base. Many planes were damaged by flak. I was hit and lost my brakes. Crash landed back at B7. I was also hit by 88mm flak on July 31st and forced landed over our lines at Cuverville, near Caen. After the battle a few of us went down to the Falaise area in our Commer 15 cwt truck. The destruction was incredible, burnt out vehicles, tanks, dead animals in the fields and dead Germans on the roadside. The smell was overwhelming. I thought at the time what it must have been like on the ground being under constant attack from the air. It was the first time I had seen on the ground the destruction caused by rockets, bombs and 20mm cannon fire.



Wing Commander Gordon Sinclair OBE DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Gordon Sinclair OBE DFC

26 / 6 / 2005Died : 26 / 6 / 2005
26 / 6 / 2005Ace : 10.00 Victories
Wing Commander Gordon Sinclair OBE DFC

A short service commission officer, Sinclair joined 19 Squadron as early as 1937 and was still with the Squadron in 1940. Over Dunkirk he destroyed a Bf 109 and probably another, and then on June 1 he destroyed two Bf 110s and on a later patrol the same day he claimed a He 111 and a Do 17 destroyed. He was awarded the DFC. He knew Bader well during his stay with 19 Squadron when Bader often flew as his No 2. Sinclair remembers his forceful personality, but also that he was great fun. They often played golf and squash together. In June 1940 Sinclair was posted as Flight Commander to 310 Squadron at Drixford and was soon to fly with that Squadron as part of the Duxford Wing, led by Douglas Bader. His final score was 10 confirmed victories. He later commanded 56 Squadron on Typhoons before promotion to Wing Commander and a post on the staff of HO 84 Group. Sinclair retired from the RAF in 1957. He died on 26th June 2005.



John Jack Stafford
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by John Jack Stafford
26 / 6 / 2005Ace : 5.00 Victories
John Jack Stafford

Jack Stafford left New Zealand for the UK in 1943 and was assigned to Hurricanes with OTU at Annan before being posted to No.486 Squadron in November 1943 as a Sergeant Pilot. Based at Tangmere flying the Hawker Typhoon, No.486 Sqn was engaged in dive-bombing and ground attack operations over Europe in preparation for D-Day the following year. In April 1944 after a brief hiatus with de Havilland, Stafford returned to action and was credited with eight V-1s destroyed between 19th June and 29th August. He was promoted to Warrant Officer and commissioned the following month. Stafford was involved with covering the airborne invasion to capture the Arnhem and Nijmegan Bridges before the squadron moved to Grimbergen in Belgium. After No.486 Sqn moved to Volkel in Holland, Stafford and Flying Officer Bremner were credited with the first confirmed Me262 for the squadron on Christmas Day 1944. Jack was promoted to Flight Lieutenant in February 1945 and made Flight Commander of A Flight. On 12th April Stafford shot down and Fw190D-9 east of Ludwigslust, his last of the war. On 15th May he was posted to No.80 Sqn at Fassberg before moving to Copenhagen. His final tally was 2 confirmed kills, 3 shared and 8 V-1 rockets destroyed. Jack received the DFC and left the RNZAF in April of 1946.




Squadron Leader Basil Stapleton DFC
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Basil Stapleton DFC

13 / 4 / 2010Died : 13 / 4 / 2010
13 / 4 / 2010Ace : 6.00 Victories
Squadron Leader Basil Stapleton DFC

Born in South Africa, Basil Stapleton joined the RAF in Jan 1939, being posted to 603 Sqn flying Spitfires. He first saw action off Scotland, sharing in the destruction of two bombers, before the Squadron was posted south to Hornchurch during the height of the Battle of Britain. By Nov 1940 his tally had risen to 6 and 2 shared victories and 8 probables. In March 1942 he was posted to 257 Sqn as flight commander. In August 1944 he commanded 247 Sqn flying Typhoons, taking part in the Arnhem operations. In December 1944, whilst attacking a train, debris hit his aircraft forcing him to land behind enemy lines where he was taken prisoner of war. Stapme Stapleton had scored 6 victories, plus 2 shared, 5 probable and 2 damaged. Sadly, we have learned that Basil Stapleton passed away on 13th April 2010.




Squadron Leader L F W Stark DFC* AFC C de G (Belg)
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader L F W Stark DFC* AFC C de G (Belg)

1 / 8 / 2004Died : 1 / 8 / 2004
Squadron Leader L F W Stark DFC* AFC C de G (Belg)

Lawrence W F Stark was born on 16th November 1920 in Bolton, Lancashire and was educated at Bolton School and then The Lancashire and Manchester Technical College. Pinkie Stark joined the RAF in 1941 and trained to be a pilot in Canada. On his return to England he spent some time flying Avro Ansons and Boulton Paul Defiants before being sent to a Typhoon OTU and and to 182 Squadron, then posted on operations the 10th January 1943 to 609 Typhoon Fighter Squadron, based at Manston. The squadron had been tasked to counter the hit and run attacks over South-East England by Fw190s. On 12 March 1943 Lawrence W F Stark had his first victory when he downed a Fw190 over Dunkirk. He shot down two Ju88 bombers over France, one in October and the other on 2 November 1943. He flew so low when claiming the first of these Ju88s that he clipped the top of some trees, returning to base with branches in the now misshapen nose of his Typhoon. On 4th January 1944 he shared in the destruction of a Dornier Do217, he also shot down a Caudron Goeland transport and another Fw 190, with 5½ victories and another aircraft destroyed on the ground he qualified as an Ace. He served on with 609 Squadron throughout occupied Europe, eventually taking over as the Squadron Commander and, awarded the DFC, became an Ace as one of the most successful Typhoon pilots in aerial combat. In February 1944 he moved to 263 Typhoon Fighter Squadron as a flight commander, to carry out ground-attack operations, still with the Typhoon. He flew sorties in support of the D-Day landing attacking ground targets in Northern France but in July 1944 he was shot down in Brittany. With the help of the French resistance he evaded capture and returned to England in a motor boat. Stark later returned to 609 Squadron as commanding officer to continue the ground-attack work. Stark continued flying in the RAF and gained a Bar to his DFC. In 1947 he completed the Empire Test Course and was posted to Boscombe Down as a test pilot, in particular with the Blind Landing Experimental Unit performing automatic landing trials. He was awarded the AFC and C de G (Belg). He retired from the RAF in 1963 and later became manager of Rochester Airport.. Sadly Squadron Leader Stark passed away on the 1st of August 2004.



Pinkie Stark with his damaged Typhoon, most likely taken after his scrape with treetops while shooting down a Ju88 in October 1943.

Citation for DFC, 7th March 1944 :

This officer is a cool and resourceful fighter who had invariably displayed great keenness and determination. He has shot down 6 enemy aircraft in combat, whilst in attacks on the enemy targets on the ground he has destroyed an aircraft and a locomotive; he has also attacked a number of small vessels such as tugs and barges with damaging effect.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC, 3rd October 1944 :

Flight Lieutenant Stark has a completed a large number of sorties. He has led his flight against many difficult and dangerous targets and despite heavy enemy opposition he has always pressed home his attacks to a successful conclusion. His excellent leadership, courage and fine fighting spirit have set a splendid example to all.


Derek Tapson
Click the name above to see prints signed by Derek Tapson
Derek Tapson

Flying Typhoons with 197 Sqn against the advance of German tank forces on D-Day, he served throughout the Normandy invasions. He was shot down in February 1945 and spent the last weeks of the war as a PoW.




Flight Lieutenant Basil Tatters Tatham
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Basil Tatters Tatham

2 / 12 / 2007Died : 2 / 12 / 2007
Flight Lieutenant Basil Tatters Tatham

Basil Tatham was born on the 13th of March 1921 in Bardolfs, Knebworth and later went to St Edwards in 1936 following many months in Middlesex hospital with osteomyelitis, which nearly cost him his leg. Despite this he went on to follow his father in to the 1st XI cricket team, became captain of shooting, entered the Officer Training Corps and passed his school certificates. After finishing school in 1940 he could have gone on to university but felt duty bound to join the RAF. Basil was training in the Battle of Britain, but served through two tours as a pilot flying Hurricanes, Spitfires, Typhoons and Tempests. Tatters Tatham first flew Hurricanes with 79 Squadron, and then in 1941 on Atlantic convoys with the MSFU before being torpedoed. In May 1942 he was posted to 257 Squadron on Hurricane night fighters, before joining 247 Squadron on Typhoons. After a brief rest period instructing, he rejoined 247 Squadron the day before D-day, and spent the following months destroying German tanks and other ground targets. Basil Tatham ended the war as a Flight-Lieutenant, (he was an acting Squadron Leader) with a number of medals including the Croix de Guerre Avec Etoile de Vermeil (F). He survived being shot down twice. Sadly he passed away on 2nd December 2007.



Pilot Officer Rusty Townsend
Click the name above to see prints signed by Pilot Officer Rusty Townsend
Pilot Officer Rusty Townsend

Australian Rusty Townsend joined the RAF in 1941, trained in the USA, before returning to join 175 Squadron on rocket firing Typhoons at Warmwell. Being in the thick of the action over France against retreating German Forces, he was shot down and taken prisoner of war.




Flying Officer Frank Wheeler DFC
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flying Officer Frank Wheeler DFC
Flying Officer Frank Wheeler DFC

Frank Wheeler joined the RAF in 1941, training in England as a pilot after which he completed a period of instructing. In January 1944 he was posted to join 174 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Westhampnett, his first operation being as an escort to the Mosquitos taking part in Operation Jericho, the Amiens Jailbreak. He stayed with 174 Squadron for the remainder of the War, serving throughout occupied Europe, and in 1945, at the end of his tour of operations, he was awarded the DFC.



Flt. Lt. George Wood
Click the name above to see prints signed by Flt. Lt. George Wood
Flt. Lt. George Wood

Whilst with 263 Sqn flying a twin-engined Whirlwind he was shot down over Morlaix airfield on 30th October 1943 and successfully evaded capture and made it back to the UK with the help of the Résistance. He rejoined 197 Sqn flying Typhoons for the rest of the war.


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