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Tempest

Manufacturer : Hawker
Number Built : 1395
Production Began : 1943
Retired : 1949
Type : Fighter

The Hawker Tempest was a much improved development of the Typhoon and first flew in June 1943. and started service with the RAF in April 1944. mainly serving in the attack role in Europe against ground targets including the V1 Flying Bomb installations. It remained in service after the war until 1949 when it was eventually replaced by the Jet Aircraft. but continued for another 4 years in the Indian and Pakistan air forces. In total no less than 1395 Hawker Tempests were built. Speed: 426mph at 18,500 feet, Crew One. Range 800 miles. Armament: Four 20mm Hispano cannons mounted in the wings and a bomb payload of upto 2,000 lbs.

Tempest


Latest Tempest Artwork Releases !
 The Tempest of Wing Commander Roland Beamont DSO and Bar DFC and Bar, June 1944.

Lull Before the Storm by Keith Aspinall. (PC)
 Three 501 Sqn Hawker Tempests roar low across the North Sea outbound from Bradwell Bay, Essex, on their way to attack a German airfield at Bad Zwischehhan and nearby rail yards on the night of 2nd October 1944.  The trio comprised of Sqn Ldr Joseph Berry, flying EJ600 (SD-F), Flt Lt E L 'Willy' Williams (SD-L) and Flt Lt C A 'Horry' Hansen.  Berry was to lose his life on this mission, his aircraft being hit by ground fire from soldiers manning a radar station east of Veendam.

Tempest Moon by Ivan Berryman. (C)
 Flying his last mission with his old mount, Hawker Tempest EJ762, fresh from repair after being damaged by flak, David Fairbanks found himself embroiled in a fierce battle with Messerschmitt Bf109s on 17th December 1944.  In the course of the combat, Fairbanks shot down two of the enemy aircraft and damaged another before returning safely.

Foob Fairbanks - The Terror of the Rhine by Ivan Berryman.
 Whilst flying with other Hawker Tempests of 274 Sqn on 11th February 1945, Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks spotted a lone Arado Ar234 of the Kommando Sperling 1 (F) / 123 flown by Hauptmann Hans Felde returning to its base at Rheine.  A desperate chase commenced through the cloudbase until the German jet prepared to land, whereupon Fairbanks sent 4U+DH down in flames after a single short burst of his four 20mm cannon.

Tribute to Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks by Ivan Berryman.

Tempest Artwork Collection



Hawker Tempest Mk V JN751 R-B. by M A Kinnear.


Raging Tempest by Ivan Berryman.


Tribute to Flt Lt Pierre Clostermann by Ivan Berryman.


Bug Killer by Ivan Berryman.


Tempest Moon by Ivan Berryman.


Tribute to Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks by Ivan Berryman.

A Buzz for Beamont by David Pentland.


Overturning the Odds by Keith Woodcock


Foob Fairbanks - The Terror of the Rhine by Ivan Berryman.


Lull Before the Storm by Keith Aspinall.

Typhoon and Tempest Aces of World War Two.

The Exterminator by Stan Stokes.

Top Aces for : Tempest
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Pierre H Closterman26.00The signature of Pierre H Closterman features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
James Francis Edwards16.50The signature of James Francis Edwards features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
David C Fairbanks12.50
James Douglas Lindsay7.00The signature of James Douglas Lindsay features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Joseph Berry3.00
Squadrons for : Tempest
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.16 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th February 1915

Operta aperta - Hidden things are revealed

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No.16 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.183 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1942
Fate : Disbanded 15th November 1945
Gold Coast

Versatility

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No.183 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.213 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1969

Irritatus lacessit crabro - The hornet attacks when roused

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No.213 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.222 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1964
Natal

Pembili bo

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No.222 Sqn RAF

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No.247 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1963
China-British

Rise from the east

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No.247 Sqn RAF

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No.249 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 18th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 24th February 1969
Gold Coast

Pugnis et cacibus - With fist and heels

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No.249 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.26 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th October 1915
Fate : Disbanded 1st April 1976

N Wagter in die Lug - A guard in the sky

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No.26 Sqn RAF

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No.274 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 7th September 1945

Supero - I oversome

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No.274 Sqn RAF

274 squadron was formed as a heavy bomber squadron at Bircham Newton in April 1918, and disbanded shortly after the Armistice. On 19th August 1940 it was reformed as a fighter squadron at Amriya with ten pilots from No.80 squadron and initially equipped with Hurricanes and Gladiators. The squadron was soon to become the first in the western desert to be fully equipped with Hurricanes. They became operational in September, destroying their first enemy aircraft (two SM79s) over Maaten Bagush on 10th September. Between December and February 1941, the squadron was employed on various duties including patrols, strafing Italian troops/transport and escort work. During February it was rested and some of its pilots ferried aircraft to Greece. In April they encountered German aircraft and were involved in the intense fighting over Tobruk. These operations continued until May, when they began strafing targets in Crete and providing cover for naval ships. Until March 1942 the squadron was involved in ground attack, protective patrols and bomber escorts. In May they began to receive the first Hurri-bombers, using them for the first time against enemy transport on 8th June 1942. There now began a period of intense activity including the battle of Alamein and more shipping patrols. This continued until the Autumn when the squadron was employed on coastal defence for the rest of 1942 and the majority of 1943. January 1944 saw a move to Italy and the beginning of a period of offensive sorties against enemy roads which continued until April. The squadron was then transferred to the UK and re-equipped with Mk IX Spitfires commencing fighter sweeps and bomber escorts until June, when it was transferred to anti V-1 patrols. In August, No.274 was re-equipped with the Hawker Tempest and commenced attacks against airfields on the continent, moving to Belgium in September. Throughout the winter it was involved on mainly armed reconnaissance patrols and had several combats with Me262 jet fighters - destroying one on the 11th February 1945. The squadron maintained its program of patrols and attacks against enemy airfields with great success, its last being on 4th May. Following VE Day (8th May 1945) No.274 Squadron moved into the Occupied Zone until September 1945 when they effectively disbanded by re-numbering as No.174 Squadron.

No.287 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 19th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

C'est en forgeant - Practice makes perfect

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No.287 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.3 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

Tertius primus erit - The Third shall be first

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No.3 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.33 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th January 1916

Loyalty

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No.33 Sqn RAF

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No.349 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 9th January 1943
Fate : Disbanded 24th October 1946
Belgian

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No.349 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.485 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 1st March 1941
Fate : Disbanded 26th August 1945

Ka whawhai tonu - We will fight on

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No.485 Sqn RNZAF

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No.486 Sqn RNZAF

Country : New Zealand
Founded : 3rd March 1942
Fate : Disbanded 7th September 1945

Hiwa hau Maka - Beware of the wild winds

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No.486 Sqn RNZAF

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No.5 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th July 1913

Frangas non flectas - Thou mayst break but shall not bend me

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No.5 Sqn RAF

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No.501 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th June 1929
Fate : Disbanded 10th March 1957
County of Gloucester, City of Bristol (Auxiliary)

Nil time - Fear nothing

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No.501 Sqn RAF

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No.54 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916

Audax omnia perpeti - Boldness to endure anything

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No.54 Sqn RAF

No. 54 Squadron was formed on the 5th of May 1916 at Castle Bromwich. The squadron was equipped with BE2C's and Avro 504's and was part of the home defence force. Shortly after 54 squadron changed to day fighter duties and moved to France then equipped with Sopwith Pups. Their role was to escort bombers and attack observation balloons. Near the end of the great war 54 squadron was re -quipped with Sopwith Camels and tasked with ground attack as well as fighter sorties. In February 1919, the squadron returned to RAF Yatesbury and on 2nd October 1919 54 squadron was disbanded. On the 15th of January 1930, 54 squadron was reformed at RAF Hornchurch as a fighter squadron equipped initially with Siskin aircraft. The Siskins were subsequently replaced with Bulldog fighters and in September 1936 54 squadron was re-equipped with Gloster Gauntlets and in April 1937, they recieved Gloster Gladiators. In March 1939 the squadron recieved the new Supermarine Spitfire. After the outbreak of world war two, 54 Squadron was given the duties of patrolling the Kent coast, until having to support and give air cover to the evacuation of Dunkirk in May and June 1940. The squadron was heavily involved during the Battle of Britain until November 1940 and after the Battle of Britain had ceased the squadron moved in November 1940 to RAF Castletown where its duties were coastal patrols. In June 1942 the squadron moved to RAF Wellingore to prepare for the squadron moving to Australia. In January 1943 54 squadron joined No.1 Wing of the Royal Australian Air Force. The Spitfires of the squadron were given the role of air defence duties against Japanese air attacks in the Darwin area. After the war had ended 54 squadron was disbanded in Melbourne on the 31st of October 1945, although the squadron name continued when on the 15th of November 1945 No.183 Squadron was renumbered 54 Squadron and flew initially Hawker Tempests. Taking up jet aircraft, the squadron subsequently used Vampires, Meteors, Hunters, Phantom and Jaguars before disbanding on 11th March 2005. 54 Squadron reformed on 5th September 2005 as an ISTAR (Intelligence Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance ) unit equipped with Sentry, Nimrod and Sentinel aircraft.

No.56 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 9th June 1916
Punjab

Quid si coelum ruat - What if heaven falls

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No.56 Sqn RAF

56 Squadron was formed on 8th June 1916 and in April 1917 was posted to France as part of the Royal Flying Corps. 56 squadron was equipped with the new SE5 fighter. One of the major aerial combats of the squadron was the shooting down of Lt Werner Voss. By the end of the first world war 56 Squadron had scored 402 victories, and many famous fighter aces flew with 56 Squadron including James McCudden, Reginald Hoidge, Gerald Maxwell, Arthur Rhys-Davies, Geoffrey Hilton Bowman, Richard Mayberry, Leonard Monteagle Barlow, Cyril Crowe, Maurice Mealing, Albert Ball, Harold Walkerdine, William Roy Irwin, Eric Broadberry, Kenneth William Junor, Cecil Leiws, Keith Muspratt, Duncan Grinnell-Milne, William Spurret Fielding-Johnson, William Otway Boger, Charles Jeffs, and Harold Molyneux. The squadron lost 40 pilots during the first world war with another twenty wounded and thirty one taken prisoner. When world war two broke out on the 6th of September 1939, 56 Squadron was based at North Weald. 56 Squadron flew Hurricanes during the Battle of France and during the Battle of Britain. 56 Squadron claimed just over 100 enenmy aircraft shot down during 1940. In 1941 as part of the Duxford Wing it was the first squadron to be equipped with the new Hawker Typhoon and during 1942 and 1943 was based ay RAF Matlaske as part of No.12 Group. No 56 Squadron was the frist squadron to confirm a victory while flying the Hawker Typhoon. In 1944 56 Squadron moved to RAF Newchurch and was re equipped with the new Hawker Tempest V, becoming part of the No.150 Wing under the command of the Ace Wing Commander Roland Beamont. 56 Squadron's new role was to defend Britian against the V1 flying bombs, and the squadron shot down around 75 V1s. The squadron moved to Europe on the 28th of September 1944 to Grimbergen in Belgium as part fo 122 Wing of the Second Tactical Air Force. During this period to the end of the war 56 Squadron became joint top scorers with a total of 149 aircraft cliamed. Over its history the squadron flew, SE5's Sopwith Snipes, Gloster Grebes, Armstrong Whitworth Siskins, Bristol Bulldogs, Gloster Gauntlets, Gloster Gladiators, Harker Hurricanes, Hawker Typhoon, and Hawker Tempests. Battle of Honours of the Squadron are : Western front 1917 - 1918 , Arras, Ypres 1917, Cambrai 1917, Soome 1918, Amiens, Hindenburg Line. During World war two : France and the Low Countries 1940, Battle of Britian, Fortress Europe 1942 - 1944, Dieppe, France, Germany 1944 - 1945, Home Defence 1942 - 1945 and Arnhem.

No.6 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st January 1914

Oculi exercitus - The eyes of the army

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No.6 Sqn RAF

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No.8 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1915

Uspiam et passim - Everywhere unbounded

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No.8 Sqn RAF

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No.80 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 28th September 1960

Nil nobis obstare potest - Nothing can stop us

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No.80 Sqn RAF

80 Squadron was formed at Montrose on the 10th August 1917, and saw action in France, specialising in the ground attack role. Remaining in Belgium after the war, they moved to Egypt in May 1919 where it was renumbered 56 the following year. 80 squadron re-formed at Kenley on 8th March 1937, equipped with Gloster Gauntlets and Gladiators. Posted to Egypt in May 1938, the squadron joined No.33 to form a Gladiator Wing for defence of the Suez canal. When Italy entered the war, 80 squadron was stationed at Amriya equipped with Gladiators and one Hurricane. In November 1940, the squadron moved to Greece and in February 1941, the squadron equipped with a mixture of Gladiators and Hurricanes was used on bomber escort duties. In March the Germans came to the aid of their Italian Allies and on 24th March the squadron was evacuated to Crete and then to Palestine. In November 1941 they returned to the Western Desert to take part in the relief of Tobruk. During 1942-43, the squadron was on defence duties and convoy escort work over the Eastern Mediterranean. Posted to Italy in January 1944 and then onto the UK, they were re-equipped with Spitfires Mk IX. 80 Squadron then took part in bomber escorts, sweeps and armed reconnaissance. They began to re-equip with the Hawker Tempest, and were used for anti V1 operations. 80 Squadron was posted to the continent to support the Arnhem landings and roamed over Germany in the ground attack role. They remained in Germany as part of the occupation force until 1949. It was then sent to Hong Kong on air defence duties equipped with Spitfires and Hornets between 1949 and 1955. Disbanded in 1955, 80 Squadron reformed in Germany as a P R Squadron equipped with Canberras PR7. They finally disbanded in September 1969.
Signatures for : Tempest
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo


Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson
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Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson

Flying Officer (Acting Flt/Lt) Bill Anderson flew with 16 Sqn from 1943 until the war was over. He trained in Georgia, USA, before becoming attached to 16 Sqn at Benson, flying missions over France and Germany. Bill flew many different types of aircraft beginning with a PT17 Stearman in the USA; others include Tiger Moths, Typhoons, Tempest, Harvards, Lysanders, Hurricanes and Oxfords.




Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL

19 / 11 / 2001Died : 19 / 11 / 2001
Wing Commander Roland Bee Beamont CBE DSO DFC DL

One of World War IIs great characters, Bee flew Hurricanes with 87 Squadron, later leading a Tempest Wing. He had 8 victories plus a further 32 VIs destroyed. After the war he became a highly respected Chief Test Pilot.Wing Commander Roland Beamont, one of the RAFs top buzz bomb interceptors, was born in Enfield England on August 10, 1920. Educated at Eastborne College, Beamont accepted a short service commission with the Royal Air Force in 1938. He commenced flying in 1939 at the the No. 13 Reserve Flying School at White Waltham. His initial duty was with the Group Fighter Pool at St. Athan where he learned to fly the Hurricane. Beamont was soon posted with the No. 87 Squadron which was part of the Advanced Air Striking Force in France. Seeing action in both France and Belgium prior to the Allied withdrawl, Beamont rejoined 87 Squadron in England during the Battle of Britain. In the spring of 1941 Beamont was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross after destroying five enemy aircraft. As Commanding Officer of 609 Squadron, Beamont pioneered both day and night ground attack missions utilizing the Typhoon. Beamont was credited with destroying 25 trains in a three month period. He was then made responsible for organizing and commanding the first Tempest Wing at Newchurch. Three days after D-Day Bearnont shot down an Me-109, marking the first aerial combat victory for the Hawker Tempest. In the summer of 1944 Beamont destroyed 32 buzz bombs prior to leading his wing to a Dutch Airfield at Volkel on the Continent. In October of 1944 Beamont was shot down during a ground attack mission over Germany, and he remained a prisoner of war until wars end. Following repatriation Beamont became an experimental test pilot with the Gloster Aircraft Company, which had developed the RAFs first jet aircraft. Turning down a permanent commission with the RAF, Beamont then joined English Electric Company in Wharton as the Chief Test Pilot for the B3/45 (Canberra) jet bomber program. He managed all prototype testing on the Canberra, and in the process set two Atlantic speed records. Later Beamont was involved with the supersonic P1/Lightning program, and became the first British pilot to fly at twice the speed of sound. From 1965 until 1970 he was a founding member of Britains highly succesful Saudi Arabian export program. For several years prior to his retirement in 1979, Beamont was Director of Operations for British Aerospace and Panavia where he was in charge of flight testing for the Tornado. Since his retirement Beamont has authored nine books, and published numerous magazine articles. He is a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Scociety and an Honorary Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots in America. He died 19th November 2001.



Bee Beamont in the cockpit.



Flying Officer John Byrne
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Flying Officer John Byrne

With the RAF since 1938, Byrne flew Hurricanes, Spitfires, P-47s, Tempests and Typhoons during WWII. Upon joining 197 Sqn in March 1944 he flew Typhoons during one the squadrons most hectic periods in the run up to D-Day and throughout the subsequent Allied invasion, mostly on low-level bombing missions. In total Byrne completed over 150 combat operations and finally left the RAF in 1946.




Colonel Pierre Clostermann CDLL L&H MM CdeG DFC*
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22 / 3 / 2006Died : 22 / 3 / 2006
22 / 3 / 2006Ace : 26.00 Victories
Colonel Pierre Clostermann CDLL L&H MM CdeG DFC*

One of the RAFs best known fighter pilots, with more than 20 victories, Clostermann was a Free French officer and later the author of a classic book about World War Two flying, The Big Show. Clostermann came to Britain via the United States and was first in action with 341 (Alsace) Squadron on Spitfires in 1943. By D-Day he was with 602 Squadron, also on Spitfires, and flew a patrol over the beaches late in the afternoon of June 6th. On June 14th he became the first French pilot to land in liberated France. Rested in July 1944, Clostermann returned to action in January 1945 and from 4th March was flying Tempests with 274 Squadron. His first Tempest score was a Bf 109 on his second day during a cannon test. In the middle of March 1945 he was posted as a Flight commander to No 56 Squadron. With this unit he destroyed a Bf109 in the air. On 8th April he was transferred to No 3 Squadron as A Flight commander where he on 20th April scored two Fw190D-9s. Clostermanns final score in Tempest is at least 12 destroyed, 6 shared and 2 probables. He was awarded the DSO and DFC and Bar in addition to French, Belgian and American decorations. Post war he achieved world-wide fame with The Big Show, and other books, and enjoyed a substantial career in politics and the aviation industry. Pierre Clostermann passed away on 22nd March 2006.


Final Total : 33 destroyed

19 Fw190
7 Me109
2 Dornier 24
1 Fieseler 156
1 Ju252
1 Ju88
1 Ju290
1 Heinkel 111

On the ground he destroyed :

7 Ju88
6 Do18
4 He177
2 Arado 323
1 Ju252
1 Blom-Voss
,br>Add to it some 72 locomotives , 5 tanks , 1 submarine and 2 destroyers.


Wing Commander J F Stocky Edwards DFC* DFM
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22 / 3 / 2006Ace : 16.50 Victories
Wing Commander J F Stocky Edwards DFC* DFM

Stocky Edwards became a P40 Ace with 260 Sqn. 94 Sqn RAF, Flight Commander 260 Sqn RAF, 417 Sqn RCAF, Flight Commander 92 Sqn RAF, Squadron Commander 274 Sqn RAF, Wing Leader 127 Wing RCAF. His victory total was 15 with 3 shared.



Flight Lieutenant Bill Green
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Flight Lieutenant Bill Green

In December 1936, Bill Green joined the Auxiliary Air Force as an aero engine fitter with 501 Squadron at Filton, near Bristol. Shortly before the start of the Second World War, he was given a rare chance for an engine fitter. In 1938 he joined a scheme to recruit NCO pilots, qualifying as a Flight Sergeant and re-joined 501 at Bristol in July 1940. Sgt Bill Green had completed just 10 hours of dual flying with an instructor. In October, he was sent for further flying instruction and on October 30th he had his first solo flight in a Magister aircraft. After more training and getting married on June 3rd he flew a Hurricane for the first time on August 8th 1940, when the Battle of Britain had been raging for a month. He flew from Kenley throughout the Battle of Britain until November, surviving being shot down twice, before being posted to 504 Squadron. After a spell instructing on Spitfires and Tomahawks, he converted to Typhoons, and from November 1944 served with 56 Squadron on Tempests. He flew more than 50 missions in Tempest fighter aircraft with 56 Squadron. He was shot down over Germany on February 22nd 1945 and spent the last three months of the war as a prisoner of war. After the war, Green enjoyed a hugely successful business career, ending up as the managing director and chairman of Crown Paints, before retiring on his 60th birthday.



Flying Officer Tom Hannam
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Flying Officer Tom Hannam

Flying Officer Tom Hannam qualified as a pilot in October 1942 having been trained by the US Army Air Forces in Georgia, Alabama and Florida. Returning to the UK and after Operational Training Unit he joined 222 (Natal) Squadron, which was equipped with Spitfires Mark Vs in January/February 1943 aged 21. Most operational sorties were on sweeps, high cover for bombers and ships convey patrols. At the end of September he was shot down over Normandy and spent the next three months avoiding capture by the Germans. Eventually arriving in Gibraltar he was flown home on 23 December 1943. After a brief period he rejoined 222 Squadron to take part in the invasion of Europe and went through Northern France, Belgium and Holland. In December 1944, with the war in Europe no more than 5 months from its end, the Squadron converted onto Tempests Mark Vs and returned to Europe supporting the crossing of the Rhine near Nijmegen and then into Germany. Operational flying covered attacks on airfields, trains, road transport, tanks and rocket sites. When the war in Europe ended he became a flying instructor on Tiger Moths for a short period. Tom returned to civilian life a little older but very much wiser.




Flight Lieutenant James Kyle DFM
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Flight Lieutenant James Kyle DFM

James Kyle joined the RAF in 1941 and trained as a pilot in Dallas, Texas, before returning home to become a member of 197 Typhoon Fighter Squadron at Drem upon its formation. In March 1943 the Squadron moved to Tangmere, and he became one of a precious few survivors of a full tour of operations, being awarded the DFM in 1944. He was demobilised in 1947 as a flight commander with 80 Tempest Fighter Squadron in Germany. He spent some years away from the service but the urge to fly never left and he rejoined the RAF in 1951 and became a Qualified Flying Instructor. He retired in 1974 after 30 years service.



Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC
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22 / 3 / 2006Ace : 7.00 Victories
Wing Commander James Lindsay DFC

Born in September 1922, James Doug Lindsay joined the RCAF in February 1941, training on Harvards. He was posted to the UK, arriving in March 1943 and joining 403 Sqn in October that year. In his first tour, he claimed 5 Me109s as well as 2 Fw190s, plus another damaged. Of the Me109s he shot down, three of these were in a single minute, earning him a DFC. For his second tour, he rejoined 403 Sqn in April 1945, claiming a probable Fw190 during his short time with this squadron before he moved to 416 squadron until the end of the war in Europe. After the war he stayed with the air force, and in 1952 served during the Korean war with the USAF. He flew F-86 Sabres with the 39th Fighter Squadron of the 51st Fighter Wing, claiming victories over two MiG-15s and damaging 3 others. In 1953, he returned to the UK with No.1 Fighter Wing leading Sabres in formation at the Queen's Coronation. He retired in 1972, having flown more than 30 different types of aircraft (excluding different Mks). These included, Harvard, Anson, Master, Spitfire, Typhoon, Tempest, Hurricane, Mustang, Beaufort, Beaufighter, Oxford, Dakota, Tiger Moth, Vampire and Sabre.




Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell
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Flight Lieutenant Derek Lovell

Volunteered for the RAFVR in January 1941. He trained in Canada on Tiger Moths and Oxfords. He received his wings in April 1942 and was posted to Central Flying School. Following graduation, he taught Fleet Air Arm trainees on Harvards. He returned to the UK in March 1943 and flew Masters at AFU and Hurricanes at OTU. He taught Lancaster crews fighter evasion prior to posting to 84 GSU to fly Typhoons. He joined 197 Squadron at Needs Oar Point in the New Forest in June 1944 and was involved in close support operations and tactical dive bombing and low level bombing throughout the Normandy campaign and on through to VE-Day. He completed 135 operations and in August 1945 was posted to an OTU to instruct on Typhoons and Tempest Vs. He was demobbed in June 1946 and flew weekends in the VR on Tiger Moths and later Chipmunks. He was called up on the G Reserve in July 1951 and flew Harvards, Spitfire XXIIs and then Vampire Vs. He stood down in September as the Korea situation eased.



W/O Bill Macia
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W/O Bill Macia

3 Tempest Sqn but also flew Typhoons.